Author Topic: News Coverage: January 16 - 22  (Read 10497 times)

Offline ennisandjack

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News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« on: Jan 16, 2006, 12:49 AM »
Please post all BBM related news for the coming week in this thread. You are welcome to post any comments related to the news in the topic as well.
« Last Edit: Jan 16, 2006, 12:51 AM by ennisandjack »

Offline *Froggy*

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'Brokeback Mountain' Gets 4 Golden Globes
« Reply #1 on: Jan 16, 2006, 11:31 PM »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/golden_globes;_ylt=ApamM4XsHzPvwFpXUbsq44TBaMYA;_ylu=X3oDMTA5bGVna3NhBHNlYwNzc3JlbA--



By DAVID GERMAIN, AP Movie Writer 19 minutes ago

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - The cowboy romance "Brokeback Mountain" led the Golden Globes on Monday with four prizes, including best dramatic film and the directing honor for
Ang Lee.
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It was a triumphant night for films dealing with homosexuality and transsexuality. Along with the victories for "Brokeback Mountain," acting honors went to
Felicity Huffman in a gender-bending role as a man preparing for sex-change surgery in "Transamerica" and
Philip Seymour Hoffman as gay author Truman Capote in "Capote."

"I know as actors our job is usually to shed our skins, but I think as people our job is to become who we really are and so I would like to salute the men and women who brave ostracism, alienation and a life lived on the margins to become who they really are," Huffman said.

The Johnny Cash biography "Walk the Line" won the Globe for best musical or comedy film and earned acting honors for stars
Joaquin Phoenix and
Reese Witherspoon.

Director Lee's "Brokeback Mountain," the story of two rugged Western family men (
Heath Ledger and
Jake Gyllenhaal) concealing their affair, has emerged as a front-runner for the
Oscars — which occasionally have handed out top acting prizes for performers in homosexual or gender-bending roles but have never given the best-picture Oscar to a gay-themed film.

Oscar nominations come out Jan. 31, with the awards presented March 5.

"Brokeback Mountain" also won for best screenplay and song, "A Love That Will Never Grow Old."

Phoenix and Witherspoon won for best actor and actress in a movie musical or comedy for the biopic that follows country legend Cash's career and his long courtship with the love of his life, June Carter.

The Globe audience clapped along to Cash's song "I Walk the Line" as Phoenix took the stage.

"Who would ever have thought that I would win in the comedy or musical category?" said Phoenix, poking fun at his image for dark, brooding roles. "Not expected."

Phoenix, who did his own singing in the film, thanked "John and June for sharing their life with all of us."

"This film is really important to me," said Witherspoon, who offers a spirited performance and fine singing as Carter. "It's about where I grew up, it's about the music I grew up listening to, so it's very meaningful."

George Clooney, who was among the directing nominees for "Good Night, and Good Luck," won the supporting-actor Globe for the oil-industry thriller "Syriana" and
Rachel Weisz earned the supporting-actress prize for the murder thriller "The Constant Gardener."

"Syriana" spins a convoluted story of multiple characters caught up in a web of deceit, greed, corruption and power-brokering over Middle Eastern oil supplies. Clooney plays a fiercely devoted
CIA undercover agent who comes to question his country's actions in the region.

Clooney thanked writer-director Stephen Gaghan for a movie "that asks a lot of difficult questions."

There are similar corporate undertones to "The Constant Gardener," in which Weisz plays a humanitarian-aid worker whose husband (
Ralph Fiennes) is drawn into a dogged investigation of business interests connected to her murder.

"I share this with Ralph Fiennes," said Weisz. "One couldn't ask for a more magical, a more magical, committed actor."

"Brokeback Mountain" won the screenplay award for Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana. McMurtry thanked his constant companion during the lonely process of writing.

"Most heartfelt, I thank my typewriter. My typewriter is a Hermes 3000, surely one of the noblest instruments of European genius," McMurtry said.

The Palestinian film "Paradise Now," a dark tale of two Arab friends tapped to carry out a suicide bombing in
Israel, won the prize for foreign-language film.

Television winners included
Geena Davis for best drama series actress as the U.S. president in "Commander in Chief,"
Hugh Laurie for drama series actor as a cranky, pill-popping doctor in "House," Steve Carell for best comedy series actor as an incompetent boss in "The Office," Jonathan Rhys Meyers for miniseries or movie actor as
Elvis Presley in "Elvis," and
S. Epatha Merkerson for miniseries or movie actress as a boarding house proprietor who takes in an outcast teen in "Lackawanna Blues."

"This is really wonderful for a fledgling little show like ours," said Davis, who added that a little girl coming into the Globes stopped her to say, "Because of you I want to be president some day.

"Well, that didn't actually happen," Davis joked. "But it could have."

Mary-Louise Parker of "Weeds" beat out the four lead actresses of "Desperate Housewives" for best actress in a comedy series. But "Desperate Housewives" did win for best musical or comedy series.

The Globes are awarded by the relatively small Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which has about 80 members, compared with the 5,800 film professionals eligible to vote for the Oscars.

Still, the Globes have an excellent track record at predicting the Oscars. Globe winners catch momentum that can boost their chances come Oscar night.
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 17, 2006, 01:16 AM »
...won.

Offline ennisandjack

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #3 on: Jan 17, 2006, 03:36 PM »
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/17/movies/redcarpet/17glob.html

At the Globes, 'Brokeback Mountain' Takes Top Awards

By SHARON WAXMAN
Published: January 17, 2006

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 16 - A groundbreaking film about a love affair between two cowboys took top awards at the 63rd Golden Globes on Monday, a ceremony that dealt almost entirely with low-budget, art house films that have not yet broken through to blockbuster-size audiences.

"Brokeback Mountain," a groundbreaking film about a love affair between two cowboys, took top awards at the 63rd Golden Globes. Ang Lee, above, was named best director for the film.

"Brokeback Mountain," a poetic film that spans a 20-year romance, based on the short story by Annie Proulx, won best dramatic film, best director for Ang Lee, best screenplay for Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana and best song.

The film, starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal as the lovers, has raised the issue of the acceptance of gay relationships on screen and in wider American society. The film has been enthusiastically embraced by critics and within Hollywood, but has met some resistance in the broader public, and even now is playing in only 683 theaters, having taken in $30.8 million.

One Utah theater pulled the film from distribution, and the comedian Larry David sparked debate when he wrote a humorous Op-Ed article in The New York Times saying he could not bring himself to see the film. Focus Features, which is releasing "Brokeback," has lately been publishing ads showing the lead actors with their on-screen wives, rather than as lovers.

Accepting his award, Mr. Lee saluted "the power of movies to change the way we're thinking."

click here for rest of article (mostly unrelated to BBM)
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/17/movies/redcarpet/17glob.html


Offline sweetlilg

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #4 on: Jan 17, 2006, 05:03 PM »
Brokeback Mountain' wins big

http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060117/LIFE/601170359/1005

By DAVID BAUDER
Associated Press
01/17/2006

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- The Golden Globes, once again, played it loose. The first big awards show of the season was its usual party-atmosphere self.

The Globes boosted the Oscar prospects of the gay cowboy drama, "Brokeback Mountain," which won four awards, including best dramatic film. The Johnny Cash biopic, "Walk the Line," was named best musical or comedy and its stars, Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon, won acting awards.

But for television viewers who have grown accustomed to stiff, dull awards shows, the Globes delivered some entertainment with its trophies. Whether the alcohol served to audience members as they waited helped, only the bartenders know for sure.
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"This is early. I haven't had a
 drink yet," said George Clooney, accepting a supporting actor trophy for the thriller "Syriana."

Then he brought that claim into question with an off-color joke about Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

The tone was set. Steve Carell, Hugh Laurie, Geena Davis all delivered laughs in exchange for their awards.

Carell, winner of a best comic actor award for TV's "The Office," said he hadn't written a speech but his wife did. As his wife, Nancy, grinned in the audience, he read "her" speech, which thanked her four times.

"Nancy, my precious wife who put her career on hold in support of mine and who sometimes wishes that I would let her know when I'm going to be home late so she can schedule her life, which is no less important than mine," he said.

Nancy got a fifth thank you later, from "Lost" creator Damon Lindelof when he picked up his Globe for best drama series.

Davis told a heart-tugging story of a little girl who spoke to her about her Globe-winning role as President Mackenzie Allen in ABC's "Commander in Chief." Because of Davis, the girl wanted to grow up to be president.

"Well, that didn't actually happen," she said. "Ahh, but it could have. It very well could have. And if I was in the farmlands of Nebraska or somewhere, there could have been a little girl."

Laurie said he had 172 people to thank for winning a Globe for his role in "House." Rather than read them all, he said he wrote their names on slips of paper and would choose three at random. He thanked the show's script supervisor, hair stylist and, finally, his agent.

"That's not my handwriting," he said. "Oh, he's good."

Oh, yes. The awards.

Phoenix and Witherspoon won for best actor and actress in a movie musical or comedy for the biography that follows country legend Cash's career and his long courtship with the love of his life, June Carter.

"This film is really important to me," said Witherspoon, who gave a spirited, strong-willed performance as Carter. "It's about where I grew up, it's about the music I grew up listening to, so it's very meaningful."

"Brokeback Mountain," which told the story of two cowboys who concealed a decades-long love affair, was named best dramatic film and won the best director award for Ang Lee. Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana won best screenplay for their work on the film.

McMurtry thanked his constant companion during the lonely process of writing.

"Most heartfelt, I thank my typewriter. My typewriter is a Hermes 3000, surely one of the noblest instruments of European genius," McMurtry said.

It was a triumphant night for films dealing with homosexuality and transsexuality. Along with the victories for "Brokeback Mountain," acting honors went to Felicity Huffman in a gender-bending role as a man preparing for sex-change surgery in "Transamerica" and Philip Seymour Hoffman as gay author Truman Capote in "Capote."

The two television shows that transformed ABC, "Desperate Housewives" and "Lost," were named best comedy and drama. But although four "Desperate Housewives" actresses competed for best comic actress, they all lost to Mary-Louise Parker of Showtime's "Weeds."

"I know everyone thinks they have the best cast but I ... just get to go work with such great actors who are so talented ... who are so wonderful and kind and good and wonderful and sexy and great and I just want to make out with all of you," Parker said.

The Palestinian film "Paradise Now," a dark tale of two Arab friends tapped to carry out a suicide bombing in Israel, won the prize for foreign-language film.

"Brokeback Mountain," "Capote" and "Transamerica" were among the key contenders going into the Golden Globes, a potential breakthrough night for movies dealing with homosexuality or transsexualism.

"Brokeback Mountain," starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal, has emerged as a potential front-runner for the Oscars.

The Globes won by those films could help position them for major honors at the Oscars, which occasionally have handed out top acting prizes for performers in homosexual or gender-bending roles but have never given the best-picture Oscar to a gay-themed film.

Oscar nominations come out Jan. 31, with the awards presented March 5.

The Globes are awarded by the relatively small Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which has about 80 members, compared with the 5,800 film professionals eligible to vote for the Oscars.

Still, the Globes have an excellent track record at predicting the Oscars.

Two years ago, Globe winners Sean Penn, Charlize Theron, Tim Robbins and Renee Zellweger all went on to receive the four acting Oscars. Best picture "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" and director Peter Jackson earned their Oscars after winning first at the Globes.

A win at the Globes is no guarantee of Oscar success, though. Last year, the Howard Hughes epic, "The Aviator," took the drama prize at the Globes, but the boxing saga, "Million Dollar Baby," won the best-picture Oscar.

WINNERS of the 63rd ANNUAL GOLDEN GLOBES

MOTION PICTURES

Picture, Drama: “Brokeback Mountain”

Actress, Drama: Felicity Huffman, “Transamerica”

Actor, Drama: Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Capote”

Picture, Musical or Comedy: “Walk the Line”

Actress, Musical or Comedy: Reese Witherspoon, “Walk the Line”

Actor, Musical or Comedy: Joaquin Phoenix, “Walk the Line”

Supporting Actress: Rachel Weisz, “The Constant Gardener”

Supporting Actor: George Clooney, “Syriana”

Director: Ang Lee, “Brokeback Mountain”

Screenplay: Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, “Brokeback Mountain”

Foreign Language: “Paradise Now,” Palestine

Original Song: “A Love That Will Never Grow Old” for “Brokeback Mountain”

Original Score: John Williams, “Memoirs of a Geisha”

TELEVISION

Drama Series: “Lost,” ABC

Actress, Drama: Geena Davis, “Commander in Chief”

Actor, Drama: Hugh Laurie, “House”

Series, Musical or Comedy: “Desperate Housewives,” ABC

Actress, Musical or Comedy: Mary-Louise Parker, “Weeds”

Actor, Musical or Comedy: Steve Carell, “The Office”

Miniseries or movie: “Empire Falls,” HBO

Actress, Miniseries or Movie: S. Epatha Merkerson, “Lackawanna Blues”

Actor, Miniseries or Movie: Jonathan Rhys Meyers, “Elvis”

Supporting Actress, Series, Miniseries or Movie: Sandra Oh, “Grey’s Anatomy”

Supporting Actor, Series Miniseries or Movie: Paul Newman, “Empire Falls”

Cecil B. DeMille Award: Anthony Hopkins
« Last Edit: Jan 17, 2006, 05:04 PM by sweetlilg »
"Sometimes I miss you SO MUCH I can hardly stand it" - Jack <3

RIP Heath ♥ Heath, I swear...

BrokeBack Mountain is the BEST! It has won the Oscar of my heart!

Offline ennisandjack

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #5 on: Jan 18, 2006, 02:09 AM »
Misunderstanding Brokeback Mountain

By Lee Harris 17 Jan 2006

http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011606D

Brokeback Mountain is a movie that has received much praise and attention, and it is one that deserves it. Yet there is an aspect of the film that has gone unnoticed. Though it is often spoken of as a love story between two gay cowboys, it isn’t really that at all. Paradoxically, it is a love story between two “homophobic” men -- two genuinely macho guys who felt visceral revulsion at everything that our culture has come to associate with the word gay.

Admittedly, this is a contrarian view of the movie. For example, in a review of Brokeback Mountain in the gay magazine David, the author has called the movie “arguably a gay polemic,” and asserts that it presents “its simple, passionate argument against the notion of forcing homosexuals into heterosexual ‘normal’ marriages, which doesn’t strengthen the institution any more than banning same-sex marriages does.” Yet this interpretation leaves a host of unanswered questions. For example, who “forced” the two cowboys into “normal” marriage? And what power forced them to remain in the closet, long after the era of Gay Liberation had commenced? Who told them that they had to stay in Wyoming and Texas? Are we simply to blame a homophobic society for their refusal to accept their gay status. Or are the two cowboys simply the weak and ignorant dupes of our societal norms? And would the movie have really had a happy ending if gay marriage was legal?

click here for rest of the article
http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011606D

« Last Edit: Jan 18, 2006, 02:13 AM by ennisandjack »

Offline tpe

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Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #6 on: Jan 18, 2006, 03:08 PM »
Two friends from Milan/Lucca sent me this Italian article on BBM, which contains an interview with Ang Lee.  I will be seeing this movie again with them when they visit the US next week. :)

Liam56, can you attempt a translation?  Your Italian is much better than mine. ;)

http://www.panorama.it/spettacoli/anteprime/articolo/ix1-A020001034441

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brokeback Mountain: amore gay ai tempi dei cowboy
 
 
di  Manuela Grassi
18/1/2006   
 

E' un luogo dell'anima prima ancora che reale: Brokeback Mountain è il posto dove due cowboy si sono conosciuti ed amati. E dove tornano, ogni anno, per rivivere la loro segreta passione. Del film, vincitore di quattro Golden Globe, già Leone d'oro a Venezia e destinato a rompere i tabù sul mito fondante della cultura americana, parla il regista, nuovo paladino delle coppie gay

 
I segreti di Brokeback Mountain è un film di cui si parla moltissimo ancor prima di averlo visto (è nelle sale il 20).
Un film destinato a turbare soprattutto il pubblico virile.
Fresco vincitore di quattro Golden Globe (film, sceneggiatura, regia, canzone) e favorito alla corsa agli Oscar, racconta la storia di un amore segreto tra due ragazzi poveri, incolti, soli, che nell'estate del 1963 si incontrano portando le greggi sulle montagne del Wyoming.
Nella maestosa e scomoda bellezza naturale i due si innamorano, sconfessando il loro amore. Si ameranno infelicemente tutta la vita, sposati a due mogli a dir poco malamate.

Il tema è considerato così disturbante che una catena di sale americane si è rifiutata di proiettare il film perché disonora la figura del cow-boy, mito fondante della cultura americana.
Qualche cronista maschio ha voluto vedere violenza nel rapporto sessuale tra i due personaggi Ennis Del Mar (Heath Ledger) e Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal) lassù sui monti, quando c'è solo passione e goffaggine.
Insomma il mite e gentile Ang Lee, cinquantaduenne regista di Taiwan, emigrato negli Usa nel 1978, è riuscito ancora una volta a scompigliare le carte con una storia che in teoria gli è molto lontana.

Com'è possibile che lei riesca ad affrontare con uguale intensità il mondo di Jane Austen in Ragione e sentimento, il fumetto americano in Hulk, le arti marziali orientali in Tigre e dragone o i cow-boy del Wyoming creati dalla scrittrice Annie Proulx? La sua capacità mimetica è impressionante...
Be', prima di tutto, dopo cinque anni passati a girare Tigre e dragone e Hulk ero veramente esausto. La mia intenzione era quella di fare un film piccolo, di basso profilo, con buoni attori, che forse avrebbero visto in pochi. Avevo veramente piccole aspettative...Lo abbiamo girato con pochissimi soldi in Canada.
Perché? Avevate paura a girare nel Wyoming?
Le ragioni principali è che a Calgary, in Canada abbiamo speso un quarto in meno. Per tre motivi: meno tasse, niente sindacati, a differenza che negli Usa, e maestranze cinematografiche molto sofisticate che in Wymoning non c'erano di certo. Il paesaggio canadese è poco dissimile, tanto è vero che oggi tutti i western si girano là. C'è poi un'altra ragione meno sbandierata: in Canada c'è molta libertà, nel Wyoming meno, e ci faceva paura.
Eppure l'umanità dipinta da Annie Proulx, che abita in quella regione, l'ha affascinata...
Sono stato toccato dal libro. Annie mi ha detto che quando ha deciso di scrivere quella storia era piuttosto spaventata. Il guardiano di un ranch le aveva raccontato una vicenda simile e lei aveva deciso di trasformarla in una novella. Un anno dopo la stesura, è accaduto davvero l'episodio che si vede nel film, in cui il protagonista viene picchiato a morte. Sapeva davvero dunque, di che cosa stava scrivendo, aveva ragione di avere paura.
Perché tanta violenza, secondo lei?
Non riesco a capire come si possano nutrire sentimenti così distruttivi rispetto a una storia come questa. È molto diverso dal mio modo di sentire. Ma non ho certo intenzione di cambiare il mondo!
Però riesce a dire la sua in maniera efficace.
Nella cultura da cui provengo non c'è l'insegnamento della colpa. È una cultura molto diversa da quella occidentale. Sono stato allevato in un modo non religioso. Per noi il dramma è qualcosa di estremamente diverso che da voi, quasi un esercizio filosofico.

Quindi sono a mio agio con questi argomenti: non ho un approccio occidentale, moralistico. Quello che ho voluto catturare nella storia è l'aspetto proibito, che ho utilizzato al massimo come strumento drammatico.
Credo che per vedere meglio che cos'è l'umanità, bisogna metterla sotto stress. È come se tutti noi vivessimo in incognito, poi quando c'è un grande stress siamo obbligati a venire allo scoperto: è allora che si vede che cosa c'è sotto, di che pasta siamo fatti.
Il film tocca argomenti delicati, sociali, sessuali...
Religiosi. Ma mi sono detto facciamolo e poi vediamo come sopravvivere. È per questo che ripeto a tutti: è una storia d'amore, è una storia d'amore...come un disco rotto.
Aveva già raccontato una storia gay, ma con toni completamente diversi, in Banchetto di nozze (Orso d'oro a Berlino 1993), il suo primo successo internazionale. Anche quella era una coppia che dissimulava.
Chi si nasconde è interessante per un voyeur come me. Se mi portate nel vostro salotto io vorrò andare a vedere il bagno o la stanza da letto padronale. Detto questo i due film sono molto diversi. L'unica cosa che hanno in comune è che l'omosessualità viene nascosta. Ma questa è una condizione universale, il mondo gay tende a celarsi perché è un mondo difficile da capire dall'esterno. Quello che mi interessava in quella storia era il materiale: un dramma familiare in una satira politica sulla situazione di Taiwan all'epoca, tra Cina e Stati Uniti. La realtà della coppia gay si staccava nettamente dalla follia della «normalità», dove i valori del passato scomparivano rapidamente sotto l'influenza occidentale.
Che cosa conosceva del mondo gay?
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Si sente più americano o più cinese? O è sospeso tra due mondi?
Sono nato e cresciuto a Taiwan. La base, il fondamento della mia cultura e del mio punto di vista è cinese, e questo è qualcosa che non cambierà mai.
Se devo girare un film americano o occidentale devo adottare quell'altro punto di vista, e poi trovare un equilibrio. Ci sono aspetti della cultura americana che mi inducono a pensare che non sarò mai americano. Ho sempre sofferto di problemi di identità, perché i miei genitori erano cinesi, una famiglia di proprietari terrieri distrutta durante la guerra civile, prima del 1949.
I miei nonni furono giustiziati sulla piazza. Sono sempre stato del partito dei perdenti, come Tobey Maguire nel mio film Cavalcando col diavolo. In Cina e a Taiwan ci sono stati cambiamenti ai quali non riesco ad abituarmi, con ironia a volte penso che quelli come me sono i veri cinesi. Ma sono un outsider, ovunque.
È per questo forse riesco a identificarmi con le minoranze come i gay. L'unica cosa che posso fare è girare film. E cercare di lasciare un segno.
 
 



Offline *Froggy*

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #7 on: Jan 18, 2006, 03:15 PM »
Che cosa conosceva del mondo gay?
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Quote


Great article thankx
« Last Edit: Jan 18, 2006, 03:16 PM by frog123 »
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Offline tpe

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #8 on: Jan 18, 2006, 03:18 PM »
Che cosa conosceva del mondo gay?
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Quote


Great article thankx

The Italians get this...totally!  ;D

Offline *Froggy*

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #9 on: Jan 18, 2006, 03:20 PM »
The Italians get this...totally!  ;D

They asked Ang Lee very pertinent questions! Well done!
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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #10 on: Jan 18, 2006, 06:59 PM »
Misunderstanding Brokeback Mountain

By Lee Harris 17 Jan 2006

http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011606D

Brokeback Mountain is a movie that has received much praise and attention, and it is one that deserves it. Yet there is an aspect of the film that has gone unnoticed. Though it is often spoken of as a love story between two gay cowboys, it isn’t really that at all. Paradoxically, it is a love story between two “homophobic” men -- two genuinely macho guys who felt visceral revulsion at everything that our culture has come to associate with the word gay.

Admittedly, this is a contrarian view of the movie. For example, in a review of Brokeback Mountain in the gay magazine David, the author has called the movie “arguably a gay polemic,” and asserts that it presents “its simple, passionate argument against the notion of forcing homosexuals into heterosexual ‘normal’ marriages, which doesn’t strengthen the institution any more than banning same-sex marriages does.” Yet this interpretation leaves a host of unanswered questions. For example, who “forced” the two cowboys into “normal” marriage? And what power forced them to remain in the closet, long after the era of Gay Liberation had commenced? Who told them that they had to stay in Wyoming and Texas? Are we simply to blame a homophobic society for their refusal to accept their gay status. Or are the two cowboys simply the weak and ignorant dupes of our societal norms? And would the movie have really had a happy ending if gay marriage was legal?

click here for rest of the article
http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011606D



This is a great article. Cheers.  8)

Offline ethan

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #11 on: Jan 18, 2006, 08:08 PM »
Che cosa conosceva del mondo gay?
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Quote


Great article thankx

The Italians get this...totally!  ;D

Wonderful. This forum has expanded internationally with multi-language. Love really has no boundary. What did Italians get? I want to get it too. Maybe summarize a little bit in English? Thanks.  :)
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed

Offline tpe

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #12 on: Jan 19, 2006, 10:41 AM »
Che cosa conosceva del mondo gay?
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Quote


Great article thankx

The Italians get this...totally!  ;D

Wonderful. This forum has expanded internationally with multi-language. Love really has no boundary. What did Italians get? I want to get it too. Maybe summarize a little bit in English? Thanks.  :)

Hello ethan.  Sorry I did not see this sooner.  Let me paraphrase how I read his comment.

In this excerpt, I think Ang Lee struggles to present a balance between love and the very specific sexual context that is inherent in the story.  In order to do this, he had to undergo a de-sexualization process of sorts.  But as an artist, he felt compelled to present a 'true picture', even if a homosexual context can bring out violent reactions in people, and thus unbalances them -- to the detriment of the love that is at the very core of the story.  Finally, Ang Lee highlights his belief that this 'raw nerve' in most people is nothing but the fear to face up to a discussion of (I assume) homosexual love.

What I believe the Italians undertand totally is the coexistence of love and sexuality that is at the core of 'Brokeback Mountain', and that the artist (Ang Lee) has to be true to this vision, no matter what reactions it may bring out in people.

If anyone thinks I read this wrong, feel free to comment and suggest a different interpretation of Ang Lee's comments.  :)
« Last Edit: Jan 19, 2006, 10:51 AM by tpe »

Offline tpe

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Selling BBM
« Reply #13 on: Jan 19, 2006, 12:32 PM »
From Box Office Mojo: http://www.boxofficemojo.com/features/?id=1986&p=.htm

Close-Up: Selling Brokeback Mountain
Question and Answer with Focus Features' Distribution Chief Jack Foley
by Scott Holleran
January 18, 2006


Box Office Mojo: Please describe the fundamental Focus Features philosophy and approach for releasing a movie.

Jack Foley: Each movie is unique. You have to look and see what the film is: Is it a good film? A bad film? There's no formula—you have to mate the film to its demographic. [We ask:] What is the best way to take this specific movie and position it in the marketplace with publicity, marketing and distribution to gain the greatest success? My job is to consider the film in relation to the audience that's out there in the market across America and to think who the audience is and where they are—how often do they go to the movies, and when do they go? Then I put a plan together. We look at that and then everyone adapts spending on trailers and one-sheets and publicity. You have to judge, think, plan, strategize, move. Look at what we did with The Constant Gardener—we opened it on Labor Day, which everyone said was wrong. That was exactly how the experience on City of God worked. Look at the similarity between the rollout on Brokeback Mountain and Far From Heaven. That was a gay film, too, but the rollout was different. They're not the same film. You have to be as realistic as best you can in assessing the film's artistic capability. With Brokeback Mountain, you have to think about how to play it to its strengths. The plan was always to be at 300 theaters by the end of January. We positioned the film carefully.

Box Office Mojo: When did you first see Brokeback Mountain?

Foley: A year ago in November. I believed in it right away. I'm a very emotional person. The only other movie that floored me like this movie was The English Patient. My definition of a great film is [that it speaks for itself like] when I saw Back to the Future and I didn't have to explain it to anyone—that's what this movie is—it touches you in these ways that move you.

Box Office Mojo: How is it performing?

Foley: Superbly. That whole rollout process was designed to establish more momentum. It's doing phenomenally well. For example, the strategy in Kansas City—and I used to live there—was a very aggressive approach. We took it to Westport, and at the same time we went into affluent Johnson County and we played the Glenwood Fine Arts and AMC's megaplex in Olathe, Kansas, and it did $35,000 there that weekend and we never came out of there. I deliberately took that approach in Kansas City to perk up the artsy community. I experiment. If it hadn't worked, I'd have slowed down.

Box Office Mojo: Who's responsible for the Focus release strategy?

Foley: I spent a whole lot of time studying gay markets and making the discussion about the movie less abstract.

Box Office Mojo: The paperback short story is being prominently displayed in bookstores and the soundtrack's being heavily marketed, too. Is that part of the overall sales strategy?

Foley: It really didn't have any bearing on my distribution strategy. To begin with, this was an Ang Lee film and a gay film. Ang's got a huge, huge following and, guess what? They showed up. What it does is integrates with the whole process of creating this more popular, culturally accessible movie. We're taking this from an elite film to something that's more penetrating to people who go to see King Kong and Narnia—and there may still be people who are not ready for this film.

Box Office Mojo: Are you concerned about a Hollywood backlash?

Foley: I think everyone is always concerned about that. You just hope that kind of mood swing really doesn't happen. But the reality is that this film is everything Hollywood is about. This is a popular picture driving people into theaters overcoming what everyone irrationally thought it would be trapped by—isn't that what Hollywood's all about?

Box Office Mojo: What is the cause of its success?

Foley: It's about the human condition. This is not some fabricated art piece—this is a really intelligent story that has something to say about the human condition in an honest way.

« Last Edit: Jan 19, 2006, 12:34 PM by tpe »

Offline tpe

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Re: Selling BBM
« Reply #14 on: Jan 19, 2006, 12:37 PM »
Quote
Box Office Mojo: What is the cause of its success?

Foley: It's about the human condition. This is not some fabricated art piece—this is a really intelligent story that has something to say about the human condition in an honest way.



It's about the human condition.  THIS is truly what makes BBM so great!

Offline tpe

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Soundtrack Sales Ranking
« Reply #15 on: Jan 19, 2006, 03:51 PM »
Press Release - Brokeback Mountain Soundtrack     
Thursday, January 19 2006 @ 03:28 PM EST
Contributed by: ACstaff Press Release - Brokeback Mountain Soundtrack

January 18, 2006: Verve Forecast is proud to announce that the original soundtrack to the groundbreaking film Brokeback Mountain is the number-one selling album at both Amazon.com and iTunes Music Store and is heating up at other retail outlets across the country: it is currently #2 at bn.com, #10 at Barnes and Noble, #15 at Borders Books and Music and #24 at Tower Records. The album, which is #6 on Billboard’s Soundtracks chart, was released on November 1, 2005.

The soundtrack features music from the film’s score, composed by Grammy® and British Academy Award-winner Gustavo Santaolalla as well as a number of songs both new and old from a range of artists including Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson, Rufus Wainwright, Steve Earle, Linda Ronstadt and newcomer Teddy Thompson, whose Verve Forecast debut will be released next month. “A Love That Will Never Grow Old,” written by Santaolalla and Bernie Taupin and performed by Emmylou Harris won the Golden Globe for “Best Original Song.”

The film is among the most critically lauded of the year and has garnered a number of prestigious honors, including four Golden Globes Awards for Best Picture [Drama], Best Director, Best Screenplay and the aforementioned Best Original Song.



Ron Goldstein, President and CEO of the Verve Music Group comments “We are thrilled to be associated with this film and soundtrack. Our partners in this endeavor, James Shamus at Focus Features, Kathy Nelson at Universal/NBC Studios, director Ang Lee and of course, composer and producer Gustavo Santaolalla brought us a remarkable project and we look forward to continued success with it.”

 
 

Offline *Froggy*

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #16 on: Jan 19, 2006, 04:25 PM »
In un certo senso ho dovuto seguire un processo di desessualizzazione, psicologicamente è stato difficile, definirei quel film a-sessuale. Anche se ho dovuto inserire un bacio tra uomini, cosa ardua per me. In questo film al contrario la sessualità e la storia d'amore sono al centro dell'opera. Sono dovuto andare più in profondità sia come persona che come artista, per poter poi dare un ritratto veritiero di quello che volevo raccontare. Credo ci sia una profonda paura rispetto al mondo omosessuale, ed è per questo che spesso scatena reazioni violente. Ho dovuto fare un grande lavoro di immaginazione per raffigurarmi come dovevano essere le cose e fare moltissime prove per rappresentarele nella maniera più genuina possibile. Credo che il nervo scoperto sia proprio la paura per l'argomento.
Quote

Wonderful. This forum has expanded internationally with multi-language. Love really has no boundary. What did Italians get? I want to get it too. Maybe summarize a little bit in English? Thanks.  :)

well I'd love to translate the articles...but seem to be running out o time...if you want a quick translation try babel fish: http://babelfish.altavista.com/  ;D
Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

Offline ethan

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Re: Italian Article & Interview w/ Ang Lee
« Reply #17 on: Jan 19, 2006, 06:53 PM »
Hello ethan.  Sorry I did not see this sooner.  Let me paraphrase how I read his comment.

In this excerpt, I think Ang Lee struggles to present a balance between love and the very specific sexual context that is inherent in the story.  In order to do this, he had to undergo a de-sexualization process of sorts.  But as an artist, he felt compelled to present a 'true picture', even if a homosexual context can bring out violent reactions in people, and thus unbalances them -- to the detriment of the love that is at the very core of the story.  Finally, Ang Lee highlights his belief that this 'raw nerve' in most people is nothing but the fear to face up to a discussion of (I assume) homosexual love.

What I believe the Italians undertand totally is the coexistence of love and sexuality that is at the core of 'Brokeback Mountain', and that the artist (Ang Lee) has to be true to this vision, no matter what reactions it may bring out in people.

If anyone thinks I read this wrong, feel free to comment and suggest a different interpretation of Ang Lee's comments.  :)

Wonderful piece. Thanks so much, tpe for helping me understand. Also thanks for posting the other two - interesting articles.
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed

Offline Jack Rance

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #18 on: Jan 20, 2006, 03:17 PM »
Sam Alito On Brokeback Mountain
What do the bitter neocon nominee and the amazing Oscar-bound film have in common?
By Mark Morford, SF Gate Columnist

http://sfgate.com/columnists/morford/


Long but very informative piece -worth the reading , such as:

...here is the astounding reach and power of this rare and striking little film, an emotional tinderbox of a movie that, in the wrong hands or with the wrong marketing or if it had been off pitch by just this much, could have very easily been trashed and quickly dismissed, would have hobbled the careers of two up-and-coming hunk actors, been mocked across the board and demonized by the religious right as revolting gay propaganda, the source of all ills, proof of the existence of the devil himself.
....
The screech of the right's homophobes is being easily drowned out by the fact that this astonishing, pitch-perfect film is now considered a movie that, quite literally, changes minds. Shifts perceptions. That moves the human experiment forward and makes people truly think about sex and gender and love and not in the way that, say, "Pride & Prejudice" makes you think because that kind of thinking is merely sweet and harmless, whereas "Brokeback" slaps bigotry and intolerance upside its knobby little head and induces heated discussions of the film's dynamics and politics and ideas of love over a bottle of wine and some deep curious sighing.

....
here we have this relentless neocon spiritual death wish, as evidenced by the imminent appointment of Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court, yet another dour white male judge who, by all evidence, will do everything in his power to keep America's spiritual, humanitarian and sexual progress -- you know, the exact kind of universal awareness illuminated by intensely intimate movies like "Brokeback" -- locked in the ironclad box of anti-women, anti-gay, power-über-alles conservative thinking for the next three decades or more.


Of course you may say: Oh please, this is just silly, no way is there a direct connection between Alito and "Brokeback." I mean come on, one's just a heartbreaking gay love story and one's a massive disheartening political maneuver and they simply have no direct correlation in this world as we know it and to draw a correlation is to, well, make stuff up.




Check it out ..

Offline ethan

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #19 on: Jan 20, 2006, 03:51 PM »
Thanks for posting. I especially like the following paragraph

"it doesn't matter. No matter the heat and bile of the resistance, no matter how brutish or sanctimonious the stranglehold of our leadership, no matter how many complaints about nipples or wailings about intelligent design or accusations of a "gay agenda," no matter how many uptight neocon judges they appoint, progress still manages to find the cracks, to slip through the holes, to seek the sun. Consciousness expands anyway. The river flows on. The awakening continues. It is always the way."

To accomplish this - we need more love - not just the movie like Brokeback Mountain. The future can only get brighter and I am confident.
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed

Offline ennisandjack

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #20 on: Jan 20, 2006, 09:59 PM »
Chick-Flick Cowboys
‘Brokeback Mountain’ has stolen the hearts of women in Middle America.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10930877/site/newsweek/

WEB EXCLUSIVE
By Susanna Schrobsdorff
Newsweek
Updated: 11:16 a.m. ET Jan. 20, 2006

Jan. 20, 2006 - If you think discussions about “Brokeback Mountain” are winding down, think again. The story of a doomed love affair between two cowboys in 1960s Wyoming has become a surprise commercial success, as well as a critical hit. On Tuesday, one day after its best-picture win at the Golden Globes, Ang Lee’s film based on an Annie Proulx short story hit No. 1 at the box office, topping the mainstream sports drama “Glory Road,” which was showing on about three times as many screens. With a nationwide take of more than $33 million, it has already earned more than double its production costs.

This weekend the Focus Features film, which stars Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal as hunky star-crossed lovers, will move to about 1,200 screens (up from 684) and reach even more suburban markets. But don’t necessarily expect “Brokeback,” which has a fairly explicit sex scene with the two men, to ignite widespread heartland protests. So far it has played relatively well outside the traditional coastal city areas where somber indie hits usually rise and fall. Producer James Schamus explains: “What’s driving the gross now is the gigantic numbers from the small and medium-sized cities, not New York and Los Angeles.” He attributes its success to lots of advance, Internet-driven buzz and near-universal critical acclaim.

Ben Fritz, a box-office reporter for Variety magazine, says that Focus has had a deliberately cautious strategy in distributing the film. "They've been very judicious in letting it build," he says. "By the time it reaches these small cities, there's been so much talk, there's almost a pent-up demand." So far, the plan has paid off. The film has already earned more than Focus's less-controversial "Pride and Prejudice." Fritz says that even if it does not win a best-picture Oscar, "Brokeback" is likely to become a "cultural touchstone, that we look back on in five or 10 years as an important film." And with four Golden Globes under its belt, he adds that "it's gone beyond the gay-rights issue. At this point, it just deserves to be judged like any other independent serious movie, and it's doing very well for that kind of movie."

Even in predominantly Mormon Utah, where one theater owner cancelled its scheduled showings of the picture, the film was an unexpected smash in Salt Lake City where it grossed $40,000 its first weekend. “For a film like this, that’s saying something in my business,” Schamus says. And in Mason City, Iowa, last week, 41 people petitioned an eight-screen commercial multiplex to get the movie shown. “It’s the first time I’ve seen that happen,” says the cinema’s assistant manager, Johnny Mattis, who explains that the film was scheduled to arrive on Jan. 27 anyway.

Mattis, 24, isn’t sure what all the fuss is about. “I don’t know why people really want it to come here,” he says. “I don’t like the drama-romances anyway, and I really don’t want to see one with two gay men.” But Mattis and the rest of the usually coveted audience of guys 18-34 years old aren’t the target this time. From early on, Focus said the film was aiming for the same female fans with upscale tastes who loved “Titanic.”

Ann Eichler, a 63-year-old grandmother in Scottsdale, Ariz., is smack in the middle of that demographic. She went to a 12:30 p.m. weekday showing without her husband and found the theater packed with women. “I think men are so uncomfortable with this kind of thing, even if they are very liberal-minded,” explains Eichler, who says she was enormously moved by the film. She admits she was “a little worried about a seeing a homosexual love scene, but I found I could handle it.” And she adds that her husband was kind of “don’t ask, don’t tell” about her seeing the movie. “He knows it’s out there, he just doesn’t want to talk about it.”

Eichler’s husband is not alone. On personal blogs, around water coolers and even on Web sites like WebMD.com, women are talking about trying to get their husbands to go see it and debating whether not wanting to see it makes you a homophobe--“no” say many heterosexual men, they just don’t want to see chick flicks. “I didn’t even want to see ‘Cold Mountain',” protests one.

Meanwhile, "Seinfeld" creator Larry David deftly tackled one of the most sensitive issues for some straight men in a recent New York Times op-ed piece. David said that he’s afraid to go see the film because he might hear a little voice in his head saying of the cowboys: “Go ahead, admit it, they’re cute. You can’t fool me, gay man.”

If those in the so-called cultural elite (like David) have trouble seeing a gay love story, does the film have any hope of changing nationwide attitudes on gay relationships? Armond Aserinsky, a Philadelphia-area media psychologist doesn’t think so. “Both sides in the cultural war have dug in their heels,” he says. “['Brokeback Mountain'] is preaching to the choir. It’s not going to move anyone to a new camp.”

But Schamus, the producer, has a different take: “This film has completely punctured the Red State-Blue State myth. We’ve been stereotyped as a gay cowboy movie. But it’s much more damaging to stereotype Arkansas as anti-gay. America is a much more diverse place than we’re given credit for.”

© 2006 Newsweek, Inc.




Offline jetzenpolis

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KCRW 89.9 FM: Annie Proulx on Ang Lee's film, "Brokeback Mountain" 1/19/06

www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/bw/bw060119annie_proulx


Annie Proulx is interviewed by Bookworm radio program talk show host, Michael Silverblatt.  (Look for the little headphones icon on the web page to hear the interview on podcast.)

Annie Proulx discusses how for the first time for her, as an author, her characters (in a short story or novel) began to have an independent mind while she was writing about Ennis & Jack for "Brokeback Mountain."  (They wouldn't do what she wanted them to do in the story.  They had their own minds.)

She says she felt guided from "outside" in the writing of the story.

When she Heath Ledger on the screen, she said she felt she was seeing Ennis come to life.  The characters remained with her for a long time after she finished writing the story.  Their presence was just beginning to fade from her mind when the movie was released; then they came back into her mind, bigger than life.

In the end, she concludes, Brokeback Mountain is all about "desire."
   
In the distance between what you "try to believe" and what you "know": never trust what you try to make yourself believe; trust what your intuition knows.

Offline chameau

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Re: News Coverage: January 16 - 22
« Reply #22 on: Feb 04, 2008, 10:41 PM »
we merged your post to this existing thread :)
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