Author Topic: News Coverage from 2005  (Read 5003 times)

Offline brokebackmountain

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News Coverage from 2005
« on: Dec 19, 2005, 09:34 PM »
'Brokeback' hits the 'burbs
The so-called gay cowboy movie finds broad appeal outside the major cities.
from LA Times

Will "Brokeback Mountain" play in Plano? In the movie's first weekend in the Dallas suburb where the 2004 Mel Gibson film "The Passion of the Christ" earned some of its biggest grosses, the answer appeared to be yes.

Read the rest article at

http://theenvelope.latimes.com/news/env-et-brokeback19dec19,0,371349.story?coll=env-home-subfeaturebar
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #1 on: Dec 20, 2005, 03:13 PM »
"Jackson, Wyo. (Dec. 10)- "This is what love is about," parka-wearing director Ang Lee declared on Saturday night, politely describing his controversial new movie about two love-struck Wyoming ranch hands, to a handful of paparazzi and reporters, moments before Brokeback Mountain's 6 pm premiere at Jackson Hole's Teton Theatre."

complete report at

http://www.planetjh.com/brady/brady_2005_12_11_brokeback.html
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #2 on: Dec 22, 2005, 10:39 AM »
CHICAGO — After a recent sneak preview of Ang Lee's gay-themed Western "Brokeback Mountain," the filmmaker and his longtime producer James Schamus took questions in the University of Chicago's dimly lit Max Palevsky Cinema.

"Is there a film or films that set the precedent for this movie?" one audience member asked.

" 'The Bridges of Madison County,' " Schamus replied without missing a beat.

Article from The Seattle Times.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/2002679947_anglee13.html
« Last Edit: Jan 09, 2006, 12:21 AM by brokebackmountain »
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #3 on: Dec 26, 2005, 11:21 AM »
By Melissa Dribben
Inquirer Staff Writer

"Liz Smith and her brother, Hugh Carberry, went to the movies Tuesday night at the Ritz Sixteen in Voorhees, one of the few local multiplexes where you could catch Brokeback Mountain this week.

Smith, a registered nurse who works at Friends Hospital in Philadelphia, wanted to see the film "because I have friends who are gay, and I wonder what it's like for them." Carberry, a psychologist in private practice in Mount Laurel, said, "I see a lot of gay kids who are in high school, and it's something I'd like to understand in order to help them."

The pulse of a nation can't be measured by the popularity of a single movie. But the early success of Brokeback Mountain, an anguished love story about two male ranch hands, is being interpreted by some as a sign that Americans are growing more compassionate and broad-minded about homosexuality.

"It's very clear from surveys that the country has been moving rapidly toward more acceptance," says William Doherty, professor of family and social science at the University of Minnesota. "Until the 1970s, homosexuality was considered a psychological deviance. Thirty years later, people are crying in theaters over the thwarted love of these two men."

The film, starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal, is based on a short story by Annie Proulx and directed by Academy Award winner Ang Lee. In its opening weekend, in five theaters in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, the movie pulled in more per theater than almost any film in the last two decades. Last weekend, in 69 theaters, it took in $36,354 per theater, according to Box Office Mojo, more than twice the average of King Kong (though Kong's total, $66 million, dwarfed Brokeback's $3.5 million).

Focus Features has been cautiously expanding the film's reach. Last week, after it drew sizable audiences in more conservative markets such as Plano, Texas, and St. Louis, Focus widened this weekend's release to 217 theaters. Early next month, the film is to open in 300 to 800, where it will have to perform on a much broader stage.

In Voorhees, Brokeback continues to do well, playing on three screens with 12 showings a day. Even on a weeknight, the theater was three-quarters full, with retirees, students, young and middle-aged professionals, and gay couples.

"Because it's the only film out there addressing this issue, with money behind it, it's been marked off as something different instead of Car Chase, Part 86," says Sean Griffin, coauthor with Harry Benshoff of the new book Queer Images: A History of Gay and Lesbian Film in America.

"Besides being a very well-made film with name stars, it really stresses the emotional connection between the two men. If you can get people, whether heterosexual women or anyone, to recognize and understand that these people really love each other, that's progress."

Media buzz and awards - including the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival; best picture, director and actor (Ledger) from the New York Film Critics Circle; and seven Golden Globe nominations - have oxygenated interest. Griffin says the clamor is not artificially manufactured.

"It's certainly not being marketed as heavily as King Kong," he says. "There are no Happy Meals at McDonald's for Brokeback Mountain - although wouldn't it be interesting to see what the surprise was inside that one?"

Several media analysts said the relatively frank scenes in which Ledger and Gyllenhaal are seen having sex and kissing passionately are a sign of major cultural change. The extent of the intimacy shown in the 1993 film Philadelphia, starring Tom Hanks and Antonio Banderas as a gay couple, was a scene of them dancing.

Others, however, view the film as a sign of only incremental progress.

"It's the half-full, half-empty problem," says Larry Gross, director of the school of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. "Obviously, it indicates a change in attitude. But it still presents gay life or gay experience as problematic."

Traditionally, he says, society deals with minorities in art by having them play either comic parts, as in Will & Grace, or the roles of villain and victim.

"It's hard not to make a connection between Brokeback Mountain and Matthew Shepard, as the noble victim," Gross says, referring to the 21-year-old Wyoming man murdered in 1998 in an antigay hate crime. "It's a common trope in Hollywood to humanize the outsider by showing their suffering."

Gross points out that the film is set in the past, from 1963 until the 1980s, putting viewers at a comfortable distance from culpability. And both lead roles are played by straight men.

"If everyone is so accepting of gayness," he asks, "why aren't there openly gay actors in these roles?"

Doherty agrees in part, but says: "For many people, it is still hard [to accept]. And most major religions say homosexuality is wrong. So it's amazing that a movie like this would be so popular."

Surely, no one is proposing that Brokeback signals the end of the moral debate.

To the contrary. The Catholic News Agency's Web site quotes Robert Knight, director of the Concerned Women for America's Culture and Family Institute, as saying: "Brokeback is the 'Perfect Storm' of Hollywood's war on morality. It combines high production values with a lowdown attack on morality. It's a mockery of the Western genre embodied by every movie cowboy from John Wayne to Gene Autry to Kevin Costner. I can't think of a more effective way to annoy and alienate most movie-going Americans than to show two cowboys lusting after each other and even smooching.

"Although the film reportedly portrays some problems with adultery, it comes down on the side of 'being who you are,' which means having whatever perverse and unfaithful relationship you want... If it encourages even one confused boy to engage in sex with another male, that makes it an instrument of corruption, not one of enlightenment."

The Catholic News Service's review was gentler: "While the actions taken by Ennis and Jack cannot be endorsed, the universal themes of love and loss ring true." That review was criticized as too favorable, and the initial rating by the United States Conference of Bishops Office for Film and Broadcasting was changed from "L," for limited adult audience, to "O" for morally offensive.

"A considerable amount of prejudice still exists," says Theresa Vescio, associate professor of psychology at Pennsylvania State University. Vescio conducts research on prejudice and stereotypes of gender and sexual orientation.

Theoretically, Vescio says, most people believe in equality. "Our studies show that people will say vehemently that they refuse to endorse blatant discrimination and hateful statements, but they still feel intense discomfort about gay behavior... . Men, especially, can feel threatened and uncomfortable."

Coming out of the Ritz East on Thursday afternoon, Doreen Mosher, 37, said the movie focused on universal truths.

"If we don't focus so much on the fact that there are two men in the relationship, it's really a story about humanity and love," said Mosher, a lesbian who lives in Center City.

Perhaps, she said, the cowboy theme would attract unlikely viewers, like her father, who's in his 70s. But she wasn't holding out hope.

"My father is a fisherman and a hunter, but I can guarantee you he and his buddies are not going to see it," she said. "But if, somehow, they do, they'd be moved by the story."


http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/living/religion/13481026.htm
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #4 on: Dec 28, 2005, 04:22 AM »
Have you seen any protests in your area? Here is an article for the possibilities
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brokeback Mountain, a love story between two cowboys, would seem to be a natural to spur controversy. So, where are the protests?

By Phoebe Flowers
Film Writer from Sun Sentinel
Posted December 22 2005

In theory, Brokeback Mountain should be generating a lot of controversy.

But a funny thing happened on the way to the picket line -- one never materialized.

The critically adored Ang Lee drama starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger and known, for better or worse, as "the gay cowboy movie," opened in limited release Friday in South Florida. It expands to more local theaters this weekend.

Brokeback Mountain is not just a movie; it's a bona-fide pop-culture event. For gay audiences -- along with the many heterosexuals who are equally eager to see the heartthrob stars entangled -- the movie's arrival in theaters is cause for celebration."



complete article at this LINK
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #5 on: Dec 28, 2005, 10:44 PM »
New York Times has an article about the best films of the year - and one of them is BBM which was described in the article as follow.

"If Heath Ledger has attracted so much attention for his performance in "Brokeback Mountain" it's partly because he has finally made good on his early overhyped promise and partly because his character in Ang Lee's romantic tragedy, Ennis Del Mar, represents a kind of impacted masculinity that a lot of us recognize: I don't know a single straight woman who hasn't been involved with a man as emotionally thwarted as Ennis, the man who can't tell you how he feels because he may not honestly know. And because the film is, in many respects, about how difficult it is to live in a culture that punishes men who give the appearance of being too soft, too weak and too feminine, I imagine that a lot of men, gay and straight, recognize Ennis, too.

Unlike Ennis, Jake Gyllenhaal's doe-eyed Jack Twist wears desire as openly as pain. Without his sensitive performance, without his ache and yearning, "Brokeback Mountain" wouldn't work half as well as it does. The beauty of the performance is fully evident in the scene in which the older Jack remembers when Ennis gently wrapped his arms around him during the men's first summer together. It's a devastating moment both because it juxtaposes the men's idyllic past with their difficult present, and because it reminds us of how memories live inside us as promises, rebukes and ghosts. When the scene returns to the present, you see in this man's face a lifetime of hope blur together with a lifetime of disappointment, as well as the beginning of the lovers' end."

HERE is the complete article for the best films of the year from NYT.
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #6 on: Dec 28, 2005, 11:00 PM »
LA Times wrote an article about how BBM plays in Wyoming.

How's it playing Wyoming?

*In the state where 'Brokeback Mountain' is set, the film draws raves from some, anger and surprise from others.
 
By Gil Brady, Special to The Times

JACKSON, Wyo. — Near the snowy plains of writer E. Annie Proulx's imagining, many filmgoers are having a love affair with "Brokeback Mountain."

The so-called gay cowboy movie that has become this season's critical darling opened at one playhouse here Friday. While business was slower than expected, the film earned rave reviews from those in attendance. But not everyone has fallen for Ang Lee's awards-sweeping vision."

Complete article HERE
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Offline *Froggy*

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #7 on: Dec 29, 2005, 04:12 AM »
"If Heath Ledger has attracted so much attention for his performance in "Brokeback Mountain" it's partly because he has finally made good on his early overhyped promise and partly because his character in Ang Lee's romantic tragedy, Ennis Del Mar, represents a kind of impacted masculinity that a lot of us recognize: I don't know a single straight woman who hasn't been involved with a man as emotionally thwarted as Ennis, the man who can't tell you how he feels because he may not honestly know. And because the film is, in many respects, about how difficult it is to live in a culture that punishes men who give the appearance of being too soft, too weak and too feminine, I imagine that a lot of men, gay and straight, recognize Ennis, too.

Unlike Ennis, Jake Gyllenhaal's doe-eyed Jack Twist wears desire as openly as pain. Without his sensitive performance, without his ache and yearning, "Brokeback Mountain" wouldn't work half as well as it does. The beauty of the performance is fully evident in the scene in which the older Jack remembers when Ennis gently wrapped his arms around him during the men's first summer together. It's a devastating moment both because it juxtaposes the men's idyllic past with their difficult present, and because it reminds us of how memories live inside us as promises, rebukes and ghosts. When the scene returns to the present, you see in this man's face a lifetime of hope blur together with a lifetime of disappointment, as well as the beginning of the lovers' end."

HERE is the complete article for the best films of the year from NYT.


"If Heath Ledger has attracted so much attention for his performance in "Brokeback Mountain" it's partly because he has finally made good on his early overhyped promise and partly because his character in Ang Lee's romantic tragedy, Ennis Del Mar, represents a kind of impacted masculinity that a lot of us recognize"

overhyped promise...nasty journalist...of course we knew he was a great actor...he was waiting for the right script that's all...Hicharacter in Monsters Ball was great too...small role, but great!

Don't start touching my Heath's hair!

The rest of the article is interesting...the journalist has obviously enjoyed BBM!
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #8 on: Dec 30, 2005, 02:06 AM »
Out There | 'Mountain' as a new bridge
A welcomed tale of two men in love is so much more than a "gay cowboy" film.
By Jeff Weinstein
Inquirer Columnist


I've seen Brokeback Mountain twice now, and each time have left the theater unutterably, helplessly sad. I cannot deny the power of true and passionate art to move us, and moved I was, even more after the second try. Yet I wondered about and even mistrusted the gray helplessness that for days I couldn't shake.

Some of us have spent years fighting the miserable fate that this heartbreaking film awards to its two thwarted men in love. Is it worth being dragged back, if only through the movie screen and my easily led imagination, to such a dangerous place? For gay and nongay viewers both, I'm surprised to find that the answer is yes.

My reasoning has come not through obvious logic, but in pieces.


More at http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/13496819.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp
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Offline brokebackmountain

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #9 on: Jan 09, 2006, 12:18 AM »
The following news coverage were complied from existing topics. You are welcome to leave comments on this topic.

All posted on December 18, 2005

Straight Dude's Guide to BBM

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/10342237/

Article from NY Times about the real cowboys

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/18/fashion/sundaystyles/18BROKEBACK.html?pagewanted=1&adxnnl=0&8hpib&adxnnlx=1134851120-7prFf0fg3sNjXQmtlTKxZQ

This LA Times news article talks about how this movie will play in the heartland of this country

http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/front/la-et-brokeback14dec14,1,863778.story?coll=la-headlines-frontpage&ctrack=1&cset=true
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Offline Lost_Girl

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #10 on: Mar 08, 2006, 05:55 PM »
I'm sure the articl as been already post, but I don't know where. Sorry.

Brokeback Mountain

BY ROGER EBERT / December 16, 2005

Cast & Credits
Ennis Del Mar: Heath Ledger
Jack Twist: Jake Gyllenhaal
Alma Del Mar: Michelle Williams
Lureen Twist: Anne Hathaway
Joe Aguirre: Randy Quaid

Focus Features presents a film directed by Ang Lee. Written by Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana. Based on the short story by E. Annie Proulx. Running time: 134 minutes. Rated R (for sexuality, nudity, language and some violence).


Ennis tells Jack about something he saw as a boy. "There were two old guys shacked up together. They were the joke of the town, even though they were pretty tough old birds." One day they were found beaten to death. Ennis says: "My dad, he made sure me and my brother saw it. For all I know, he did it."

This childhood memory is always there, the ghost in the room, in Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain." When he was taught by his father to hate homosexuals, Ennis was taught to hate his own feelings. Years after he first makes love with Jack on a Wyoming mountainside, after his marriage has failed, after his world has compressed to a mobile home, the laundromat, the TV, he still feels the same pain: "Why don't you let me be? It's because of you, Jack, that I'm like this -- nothing, and nobody."

But it's not because of Jack. It's because Ennis and Jack love each other and can find no way to deal with that. "Brokeback Mountain" has been described as "a gay cowboy movie," which is a cruel simplification. It is the story of a time and place where two men are forced to deny the only great passion either one will ever feel. Their tragedy is universal. It could be about two women, or lovers from different religious or ethnic groups -- any "forbidden" love.

The movie wisely never steps back to look at the larger picture, or deliver the "message." It is specifically the story of these men, this love. It stays in closeup. That's how Jack and Ennis see it. "You know I ain't queer," Ennis tells Jack after their first night together. "Me, neither," says Jack.

Their story begins in Wyoming in 1963, when Ennis (Heath Ledger) and Jack (Jake Gyllenhaal) are about 19 years old and get a job tending sheep on a mountainside. Ennis is a boy of so few words he can barely open his mouth to release them; he learned to be guarded and fearful long before he knew what he feared. Jack, who has done some rodeo riding, is a little more outgoing. After some days have passed on the mountain and some whiskey has been drunk, they suddenly and almost violently have sex.

"This is a one-shot thing we got going on here," Ennis says the next day. Jack agrees. But it's not. When the summer is over, they part laconically: “I guess I’ll see ya around, huh?”Their boss (Randy Quaid) tells Jack he doesn't want him back next summer: "You guys sure found a way to make the time pass up there. You weren't getting paid to let the dogs guard the sheep while you stemmed the rose."

Some years pass. Both men get married. Then Jack goes to visit Ennis in Wyoming, and the undiminished urgency of their passion stuns them. Their lives settle down into a routine, punctuated less often than Jack would like by "fishing trips." Ennis' wife, who has seen them kissing, says nothing about it for a long time. But she notices there are never any fish.

The movie is based on a short story by E. Annie Proulx. The screenplay is by Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana. This summer I read McMurtry's Lonesome Dove trilogy, and as I saw the movie I was reminded of Gus and Woodrow, the two cowboys who spend a lifetime together. They aren't gay; one of them is a womanizer and the other spends his whole life regretting the loss of the one woman he loved. They're straight, but just as crippled by a society that tells them how a man must behave and what he must feel.

"Brokeback Mountain" could tell its story and not necessarily be a great movie. It could be a melodrama. It could be a "gay cowboy movie." But the filmmakers have focused so intently and with such feeling on Jack and Ennis that the movie is as observant as work by Bergman. Strange but true: The more specific a film is, the more universal, because the more it understands individual characters, the more it applies to everyone. I can imagine someone weeping at this film, identifying with it, because he always wanted to stay in the Marines, or be an artist or a cabinetmaker.

Jack is able to accept a little more willingly that he is inescapably gay. In frustration and need, he goes to Mexico one night and finds a male prostitute. Prostitution is a calling with many hazards, sadness and tragedy, but it accepts human nature. It knows what some people need, and perhaps that is why every society has found a way to accommodate it. Jack thinks he and Ennis might someday buy themselves a ranch and settle down. Ennis who remembers what he saw as a boy: "This thing gets hold of us at the wrong time and wrong place and we're dead." Well, wasn't Matthew Shepard murdered in Wyoming in 1998? And Teena Brandon in Nebraska in 1993? Haven't brothers killed their sisters in the Muslim world to defend "family honor"?

There are gentle and nuanced portraits of Ennis' wife Alma (Michelle Williams) and Jack's wife Lureen (Anne Hathaway), who are important characters, seen as victims, too. Williams has a powerful scene where she finally calls Ennis on his "fishing trips," but she takes a long time to do that, because nothing in her background prepares her for what she has found out about her husband. In their own way, programs like "Jerry Springer" provide a service by focusing on people, however pathetic, who are prepared to defend what they feel. In 1963 there was nothing like that on TV. And in 2005, the situation has not entirely changed. One of the Oscar campaign ads for "Brokeback Mountain" shows Ledger and Williams together, although the movie's posters are certainly honest.

Ang Lee is a director whose films are set in many nations and many times. What they have in common is an instinctive sympathy for the characters. Born in Taiwan, he makes movies about Americans, British, Chinese, straights, gays; his sci-fi movie "Hulk" was about a misunderstood outsider. Here Lee respects the entire arc of his story, right down to the lonely conclusion.

A closing scene involving a visit by Ennis to Jack's parents is heartbreaking in what is said, and not said, about their world. A look around Jack's childhood bedroom suggests what he overcame to make room for his feelings. What we cannot be sure is this: In the flashback, are we witnessing what really happened, or how Ennis sees it in his imagination? Ennis, whose father "made sure me and my brother saw it."
YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW BAD IT GETS !!!!

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Offline Philip Smith

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Re: News Coverage from 2005
« Reply #11 on: Mar 12, 2007, 10:24 AM »
BBM Magazine Cover on Dec. 9/2005

Such a very beautiful wonderful yet a really sad touching story.