Author Topic: Post-Oscar news coverage  (Read 65654 times)

Offline frenchcda

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #60 on: Mar 08, 2006, 12:08 AM »
Paul Ryan on OutQ just said that Ernest Borgnine refused to see BBM, too. He's 89. So maybe many of the older voters behaved the same way.

                Ernest Borgnine is still alive? 



Barely!the average age of the Academy members is aprox 148 years old, their from old scholl, let be happy that soon they'lle bite the dust or Crash
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Offline ethan

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #61 on: Mar 08, 2006, 04:14 PM »


Congratulations, Ang Lee and thank you for making BBM possible.

Lee Disappointed Over 'Brokeback' Loss

By MIN LEE, AP Entertainment Writer Wed Mar 8, 9:54 AM ET

Ang Lee said promoting his Oscar-winning gay romance "Brokeback Mountain" was an arduous process and it was a disappointment not to win Oscar best picture.

"We've won every award since September, but missed out on the last one, the biggest one," Lee said in a post-Oscar news conference in Los Angeles that aired in Hong Kong Wednesday.

But he added that feeling disappointed "is human nature. And it wasn't for myself. I led a whole team of people."

"Brokeback Mountain" won Lee the best director Oscar, making him the first Asian winner of the prize. The film also won best musical score and best adapted screenplay, but lost the best picture award to "Crash" — a result considered a big upset.

Among the accolades "Brokeback" has racked up are the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, four Golden Globes, including best drama motion picture, and four British Academy Film Awards, also including best picture.

The Oscar best picture win by "Crash," which addresses racism, has stirred speculation that the U.S. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the voting body for the
Oscars, has an American bias or that it wasn't prepared to give its top honor to a movie about gays.

Lee said the process of marketing "Brokeback" was tough.

"My work was really hard. I had to fight many battles. Personally, I don't like doing press, but once a film is on the Oscar track, for half a year you're fighting the same battle," he said.

Lee said he wasn't trying to make a social statement with "Brokeback," the love story between two ranch hands set in conservative Wyoming.

"For me, 'Brokeback' isn't rebellious at all. It's a very ordinary movie. People call it groundbreaking or what not. It puts a lot of pressure on me. But I didn't feel this way when I was making the movie. This is the way gays are. It's just that they have been distorted. When two people are in love and are scared, that's the way they are," Lee told reporters.

However, Lee said he is somewhat of a rebel at heart.

"I had to fight with my background ... but I also had to live in the general environment. People have to be categorized. That's very annoying. Don't you find that annoying? Life shouldn't be like that. The world isn't like that. There's a lot of complexity. There are exceptions," Lee said.

Lee faced resistance for pursuing a career in film when growing up in his native Taiwan, a traditional, academically oriented society that looks down on the entertainment business.

He said movies are a form of dissent.

"That's why we make movies. Otherwise, we just have a leader issue an order and we all follow. Why else would there be filmmakers like us? Why else would people lock themselves in a dark room and watch a movie together?" Lee said.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060308/ap_en_mo/as_a_e_mov_ang_lee
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Offline stephan

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #62 on: Mar 08, 2006, 04:19 PM »
Thank you so much, Ethan, for this last post, and all the others, too. S

Offline Cowboy Cody

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #63 on: Mar 08, 2006, 09:56 PM »
Ernest Borgnine is still alive? YIKES.
You were goin' up there to go fishin'....NO SHIT! GIMME SEX!

JerBear418720

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #64 on: Mar 08, 2006, 10:17 PM »
Ernest Borgnine is still alive? YIKES.

...so are Olivia de Haviland, Deborah Kerr, and Celete Holm.  Kerr is 94.  Holm is in her 80s.  I don't know how old de Haviland is.  There are probably at lot more.

Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #65 on: Mar 08, 2006, 10:27 PM »
Ernest Borgnine is still alive? YIKES.

...so are Olivia de Haviland, Deborah Kerr, and Celete Holm.  Kerr is 94.  Holm is in her 80s.  I don't know how old de Haviland is.  There are probably at lot more. 

Olivia de Haviland is 89.  She's the last of the major cast members of "Gone With the Wind" - she was Melanie Hamilton later Wilkes in the movie. 

Ernest Borgnine is sitting in God's waiting room.   ;D





Offline Cowboy Cody

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #66 on: Mar 08, 2006, 10:37 PM »
I love Olivia De Haviland (I was surprised to learn years ago that Joan Fontaine was her sister).

Celeste Holm is AWESOME!

Deborah Kerr - I can live without.

God's waiting room...what the HEAD of Ernest Borgnine?
You were goin' up there to go fishin'....NO SHIT! GIMME SEX!

JerBear418720

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #67 on: Mar 08, 2006, 10:41 PM »
Ernest Borgnine is still alive? YIKES.

...so are Olivia de Haviland, Deborah Kerr, and Celete Holm.  Kerr is 94.  Holm is in her 80s.  I don't know how old de Haviland is.  There are probably at lot more. 

Olivia de Haviland is 89.  She's the last of the major cast members of "Gone With the Wind" - she was Melanie Hamilton later Wilkes in the movie. 

Ernest Borgnine is sitting in God's waiting room.   ;D






Odd, but Mr. Borgnine seems to have forgotten that he won Best Actor in 1955 for a "break-out" role in Marty.  He portrayed a schluby, pathetic meat cutter who found love for the first time in middle age.  Back then, glam was a given, and he broke from the herd....

Offline Cowboy Cody

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #68 on: Mar 08, 2006, 10:43 PM »
I wonder what he thought of his co-stars and such that were gay? The hypocrite.

ps. they should have killed him off in the Poseidon Adventure!
You were goin' up there to go fishin'....NO SHIT! GIMME SEX!

JerBear418720

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #69 on: Mar 08, 2006, 11:28 PM »
I love Olivia De Haviland (I was surprised to learn years ago that Joan Fontaine was her sister).

Celeste Holm is AWESOME!

Deborah Kerr - I can live without.

God's waiting room...what the HEAD of Ernest Borgnine?

Holm is the last surviving major cast member of All About Eve.  Loved de Haviland in The Heiress with Monty Clift (he was so....DAMN!). 

Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #70 on: Mar 09, 2006, 12:22 AM »
I love Olivia De Haviland (I was surprised to learn years ago that Joan Fontaine was her sister).

Celeste Holm is AWESOME!

Deborah Kerr - I can live without.

God's waiting room...what the HEAD of Ernest Borgnine?

Holm is the last surviving major cast member of All About Eve.  Loved de Haviland in The Heiress with Monty Clift (he was so....DAMN!).   

Yeah Celeste Holm was a fine actress.  I always remember her in "Come to the Stable" with Loretta Young.  Before my time but a great B&W film.  I forgot about "All About Eve" - a tremendous movie.   Yeah Monty Cliff was so very handsome but the car accident damaged him physically and emotionally.

And Deborah Kerr, in addition to "The King and I", "From Here to Eternity" and "An Affair to Remember", I always associate her with "Tea and Sympathy".

You're right, de Haviland and Fontaine were sisters. 

_____________________

Back to topic, thanks Ethan for the article on Ang.  I'm sure the Oscar loss has affected all of the cast. 

« Last Edit: Mar 09, 2006, 12:23 AM by hidesert »

Offline squall

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #71 on: Mar 09, 2006, 12:34 AM »
NO link for this one.  Just text.

Oscars Post Script with Junior Oscar Guru "Squall"

The Crash Heard ‘Round The World Was More Like A THUD
 

To say mouths were dropping throughout Hollywood when Jack Nicholson announced the best picture winner on March 5th would be an understatement.  Jaws were unhinging.  If you watch the replay on tivo you’ll see Jack was as shocked as the rest of us - as he later admitted.  Nicholson’s vote went to Brokeback and he assumed what most of the country if not world assumed would be the outcome, but as history has proven Academy members love to shake things up.

In 1941 How Green Was My Valley won best picture over Citizen Kane.  In 1951 An American in Paris beat A Streetcar Named Desire. In 1980 Ordinary People trumped Raging Bull and in 1975 Taxi Driver lost to Rocky.  It’s not that I’m comparing Crash to How Green Was my Valley, I mean come on. Crash wasn’t THAT good.   So what do we have here - another Academy misfire that has sparked the most controversial post Oscar climate ever. 

If you’ve been surfing the net or watching the news you’ve witnessed the backlash.  Scathing letters and complaints are amassing at the Academy.   “Trash” posters like the ones above are all over the internet.  The very popular awards site Fennec.com has officially shut down due to “The incompetence of the Academy”.   Headlines in the LA Times, Time, MSNBC and the NY Times read as “Crash and Burn” - “Did the Academy Wimp Out?” - “Breaking No Ground” - “Clueless AMPAS” - “Crash Causes Cultural Earthquake” - “The Worst Best Picture in History” - “And the Winner is…Homophobia”.   Even Google got into the mix.  If you type in “I’m really glad Crash won” what comes up is:  did you mean “I’m really glad Trash Won?”  I am not kidding.  I saw it myself.  Even Tony Curtis is catching sh** because of his homophobic remarks about Brokeback.  He probably hasn’t gotten this much fan mail in 50 years.   And here is something interesting. Variety will be publishing a full page, $10,000 ad congratulating Brokeback Mountain on winning the most awards in film history.  The ones coughing up the dough?  Fans from around the world.  WOW!  I don’t recall The Aviator getting this much attention last year.  Yes folks, it’s AWN.

Top critics, bloggers and writers across the globe have been trashing Crash and the Academy this week because it’s the year of a major “first”.  No other film in 78 years has won so many best picture precursors and lost the Oscar.  No film in 78 years has won as many awards period.  AND no film with so few precursors has ever won best picture.  How did this happen?  We were inundated with statistics for a month telling us Brokeback Mountain CANNOT lose.

What was confirmed on March 5th is something we’ve known for a long time but now only emphasized - The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a joke.  We’ve known the Oscars have been for sale since its inception.  It wasn’t until the mid nineties, thanks to the Weinsteins, that it was brought to the surface.  The trophy is more symbol than truth.  Oscars are only often based on merit. They are about money and visibility.  The Academy has long been considered the stronghold of film quality as though winners were chosen by some divine entity.  No, it’s decided by a group of fallible elitists.  Were they swayed this year?  Was there some sort of plot against the frontrunner?  A Chinese publication reported that Ang Lee was tipped off about the film’s loss before the results were ever revealed.  Ang was quoted as saying “When I knew early in the show we wouldn’t get it, I really did flare up.”  He also added there were whispers of an Academy conspiracy against Brokeback and that made him angry.   
It might be time the world finds out about this dirty little club.       

Now back to Crash.  Is it the best movie of the year?  If you base it on its box office, reviews or precursors the answer is no.  But hey, Lionsgate did a great job and secured the win with 4 million dollars in advertising and DVD’s.  Crash is just lucky producer Bob Yari didn’t file his lawsuit against the Academy before ballots were due.  If you didn’t know, there is a massive legal battle brewing on team Crash and the Academy is in the line of fire.  Would the votes have gone the same way if the Academy knew they were being sued by a Crash producer?  We’ll never know.  I do know this, sitting a few rows behind Jake Gyllenhaal was Academy president Sid Ganis.  When Crash won best picture and the Crash people were jumping out of their seats, there was Ganis, not clapping.  Hmmm.  This is turning into a Lifetime movie.  Just like Crash.
       
As far as I’m concerned, my boy Ang Lee won.  Paul Haggis didn’t which is another beef I have about the real best film.  Most of the time those two awards go hand in hand - most of the time.  If the Academy really felt the way they did about Crash then Paul Haggis should have won Best Director.  But we all know there was something else going on because Capote, Good Night and Good Luck and Brokeback Mountain are far superior films.  Read the reviews.  And the irony is that more people are talking about Brokeback being snubbed rather than Crash winning.  I think Kenneth Turan said it best in his March 6th LA Times article- “Sometimes you win by losing, and nothing has proved what a powerful, taboo-breaking, necessary film "Brokeback Mountain" was more than its loss Sunday night”.   Well said, Kenneth.   

Let’s face it, a little homophobia and a lot of Green is what turned Crash’s Valley to Gold

Offline chameau

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #72 on: Mar 09, 2006, 12:41 AM »
Welcome in squall, thanks for posting.  ;)
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Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #73 on: Mar 09, 2006, 12:41 AM »


Good article Squall, thanks for posting it.  And Welcome - first post!!!!




Offline bnjmn3

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #74 on: Mar 09, 2006, 12:46 AM »
Who wrote this? WQhere did it come from. It is fabulous. Ang knew ahead of time of the Crash win? Academy president not clapping for Best Picture Winner. Maybe this is the end of the Academy Awards.
We can't change it. We will have to stand it.

Offline scruffy

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #75 on: Mar 09, 2006, 04:01 AM »
http://www.afterelton.com/movies/2006/3/snub.html

The Brokeback Mountain Oscar Snub
by Michael Jensen, March 7, 2006
 Sunday night, Hollywood spent over three hours congratulating itself for its tolerance and progressiveness. But when it came to awarding the Best Picture, Hollywood's cowardly actions proved louder than its pretty words.

Two days after Crash's history-making upset over Brokeback,
a debate rages over why the upset happened. Was it homophobia? Was Crash simply a better movie? Did the far right's attack on Hollywood's morals frighten the voters? Or did Brokeback simply peak too soon?

First, the facts.
 

During the awards' season leading up to Sunday night's Oscars, Brokeback Mountain became the most honored movie in cinematic history. It had more Best Picture and Director wins than previous Oscar winners Schindler's List and Titanic combined. Just to name a few, Brokeback won various awards at the Golden Globes, the BAFTA's, Venice Film Festival, NY Film Critic's Circle, LA Film Critics, National Board of Review, and the Independent Spirit Awards. (Click here for a complete list.)

Meanwhile, of the major awards, Crash managed to win only the SAG Award, the Chicago Critics award, and an Image Award. And Crash won the Chicago honor mostly because Chicago-area film critic Roger Ebert relentlessly pushed it. Even then, Brokeback was the runner-up. How did Crash fare in all of the awards Brokeback won? It mostly didn't, rarely even showing up as a nominee. In fact, before the SAG awards, Crash barely merited mention as an Oscar contender.

Before Sunday night's upset, no film that had won the Writer's Guild, Director's Guild, and Producer's Guild awards did not go on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Additionally, the film with the most total Oscar nominations almost always wins the top prize; only four times in the past twenty-five years has the Best Picture winner not also been the film with the most nominations. This year Brokeback had the most nominations

Along with all these awards, Brokeback had also won the Golden Globe, all but assuring that it would win at the Oscars too. Only once, in 1973, did a film not even nominated for the Golden Globe's Best Picture go on to win the Academy Award (that movie was The Sting, and it wasn't nominated because of a mix-up at the Golden Globes). Crash did not receive a Golden Globe nomination.

Like most eventual Best Picture winners, Brokeback Mountain was by far the highest grossing film of the five nominees. It has earned $120 million worldwide, while Crash has taken in less than half that. Box-office performance has always been a factor in how the Academy votes.

One other fact: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a conservative institution. It is not necessarily conservative in the political or religious sense of the word, but rather in that its members are firm believers in tradition and precedence. By every measure of previous Oscar winners, Brokeback should have been the movie announced by Jack Nicholson. Since it wasn't, there must be a very compelling reason for Crash to have won instead.

Was it Crash's critical acclaim? To be fair, Crash did come out quite some time ago and it is common knowledge that Oscar favors, or at least remembers, movies released late in the year. Was it possible that Crash's earlier critical acclaim had been overlooked by virtually every others arts organization that dispenses awards? Perhaps once Academy voters were reminded of Crash's critical acclaim, they felt compelled to give it the Best Picture.

Turns out that can't be the case. Here again, Brokeback was clearly the frontrunner. Every year, both Premiere Magazine and Entertainment Weekly rank the year's movies according to the reviews they received. Brokeback came in first on both lists. Three other Best Picture nominees—Good Night, and Good Luck, Capote, and Munich —also placed in the Top Ten on both lists. Meanwhile, Crash ranked number thirty-six on Premiere's list, and down in the fifties on EW's. A half-dozen critics even gave it outright pans, saying it was a movie to be avoided.

Not exactly a critical darling, eh?

That means that in order for the Academy voters to have chosen Crash over Brokeback, they had to overlook the fact that Brokeback was the favorite by almost every measure the Academy has used for seventy eight years. And they had to be willing to overturn decades of Academy tradition as well. Let's be clear about something else: this disregard for tradition and precedence didn't happen because of a changing of the guard. It's not a case of new, fresh blood forcing the Academy to change their old, tired ways. Indeed, it is the old guard that upended their traditions in order to propel Crash past Brokeback.

Nor is this a discussion about the merits of Brokeback Mountain versus Crash. Art is subjective, and a Crash fan's opinion is every bit as valid as someone who loved Brokeback. What isn't subjective are the facts stated above.

The question remaining then is why did they Academy pass over Brokeback for Crash? Given the facts, there seems to be only one answer: good old-fashioned homophobia, or at least Hollywood 's fear of being perceived by Middle America as too tolerant of gay people, which is another kind of homophobia. Or perhaps it was some combination of the two things. But nothing else seems to fit the facts.

If rank homophobia was the reason, it seems Tony Curtis apparently spoke for many voters when he said he had no intention of seeing the movie and that it offered nothing “unique.” Since he hadn't seen it, it's hard to know on what basis Mr. Curtis made his claim. But clearly many Academy voters did not see anything particularly unique about it either.

Everyone watching knew this was a chance for the Academy to take a stand on what is arguably one of the most controversial issues of our time. Battles are being fought at ballot boxes, in courtrooms, schools and homes all around the country. Sunday night offered a chance for Hollywood to weigh in with their support.

Up until Jack Nicholson opened that envelope virtually everyone -- even the Las Vegas odds-makers, felt it a near certainty Hollywood do just that.

But at the last second, the Oscar voters blinked. Or perhaps like a white person publicly professing their support for a black candidate, only to then vote for their white opponent in the privacy of the voting booth, Academy voters never intended to vote for Brokeback.

Some Crash supporters have argued the Academy had to choose between honoring two very worthwhile movies, one confronting racism, one homophobia, both subjects the Oscars have overlooked in the past. And while it was a difficult choice, they argue, it was a fair decision.

Hogwash. Hollywood has already honored numerous movies that confront racism. In the Heat of the Night won back in 1967, nearly forty years ago. Schindler's List won in 1993. Other previous winners depicting racism have included Gandhi, Driving Miss Daisy, and Westside Story. And Halle Berry's Best Actress win was supposed to be the final nail in Hollywood's racist past. The point isn't to argue that racism is no longer worthy subject-matter, only that it is not groundbreaking, especially not nearly enough to overcome Brokeback's reasons for winning.

Indeed, a gay story, much less a love story, has never even been in serious contention for an Oscar. Hell, there hasn't even been a mainstream movie about a gay love story. Given just how groundbreaking Brokeback is, its being passed over for Crash -- a movie few cared about until six weeks ago -- only heightens the fact that homophobia is one of the obvious reasons for the Academy having done so.

Professional awards analyst Tom O'Neil thought he saw something unusual brewing in Hollywood over the past several weeks. “Something weird is going on among Oscar Voters,” O'Neil wrote in The Envelope, an online site run by the Los Angeles Times. "Crash and Good Night, and Good Luck have their passionate supporters who gush their honest love of those best-picture nominees, but most non-Brokeback votes I hear from Oscar voters are really anti-Brokeback." And that translates to anti-gay.

Kenneth Turan, also of the Los Angeles Times, sees something similar in the aftermath of Crash's upset. “So for people who were discomfited by Brokeback Mountain but wanted to be able to look themselves in the mirror and feel like they were good, productive liberals, Crash provided the perfect safe harbor.”

In retrospect, it's hard not to feel a little stupid for hoping that Brokeback would emerge victorious. America truly seemed to be changing on the issue of homosexuality. For every joke that ridiculed the “gay cowboy” movie, there was a joke mocking the guys who wouldn't see it. Only things haven't progressed as much as thought.

Some argue Hollywood can't be antigay since the top acting prize went to Philip Seymour Hoffman in Capote. But I put that right up there with Tom Hanks' wins for Philadelphia (as a dying gay man) and William Hurts' win for Kiss of the Spiderwoman (arguably not even gay, since Hurt's character says he wants to be a woman). This is not meant to take anything away from Hoffman, but nonetheless it sure appears that Hollywood, like America, has a much easier time accepting gays when they confirm all their stereotypes of effete, lisping, asexual men. But a movie about two masculine guys in love? That's apparently a different story.

Some might even argue that not giving Hoffman the Oscar would have been a travesty, given that he had won virtually every other Best Actor award leading up to the Oscars. How could the award be denied to the man who was so clearly the frontrunner?

But that certainly didn't stop Academy voters when it came to selecting the Best Picture.

There is a second, more nuanced explanation for the Brokeback snub. As the presenters made clear during the telecast, Hollywood is feeling defensive about declining box-office revenue. And since the nominations were announced in January, much has been made about Hollywood supposedly being “out of touch” with mainstream America. Indeed, the day of the Oscars, CNN ran a piece called “Out of Touch” wherein a reporter visited a small town in rural America to ask if anyone had seen, or would see, Brokeback. The answer for most, of course, was an indignant, “No!”

Folks in Hollywood may fear the competition presented by today's varied entertainment choices. Perhaps they were feeling uncomfortable with being seen as so different from the heartland. Or maybe it is the confluence of the two. Whichever the reason, it was Brokeback and the gay community they sacrificed to “save” themselves.

No doubt, had Brokeback won, the media would be reporting that Hollywood had proven they were wildly out of touch. Now the story is that even Hollywood isn't crazy enough to give an Oscar to “that” movie. For gay men, that makes us damned if we'd won and damned that we didn't.

What's so disappointing about this for so many gay men is that Brokeback was our movie. For years, we've been presented as prancing, mincing stereotypes, pathological killers, or suicidal depressives. Mel Gibson even threw us out of a tower in Braveheart. But with Brokeback, we had finally been given a movie that reflected the real experience and emotions of many of our lives, even if those reflections weren't happy. And we were even led to believe that our movie had crossed over and would be honored as Best Picture.

In retrospect, it's arguable that winning final prize was never really an option, at least not at this time and place in history.

But the story isn't likely to end here. Like the Democrats trying to negotiate the tricky waters of gay rights, Hollywood 's snub of Brokeback is likely to please no one. Fundamentalist Christians are unlikely to suddenly decide Hollywood does share their values. And by selecting Crash, Hollywood alienated legions of fair-minded Americans who know a cop-out when they see it.

Nor is gay America taking this lying down. Indeed, a backlash against the backlash is already brewing. Come back tomorrow and we'll talk about it.


Offline frenchcda

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #76 on: Mar 09, 2006, 04:17 AM »
very enlighting and truthfull article, there is now a wide variety of anti Academy site perking up from all over this planet, let them become the precussor to our undying love that Brokeback Mountain will not lie dormant and neither shall we anymore!  thank you
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Offline chameau

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #77 on: Mar 09, 2006, 09:33 PM »
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2006/03/07/hollywood_isnt_being_straight_with_gay_community?mode=PF

Hollywood isn't being straight with gay community

by Wesley Morris, Globe Staff  |  March 7, 2006

The Boston Globe

The crash you heard late Sunday night was not only Jack Nicholson announcing the best-picture Oscar winner. It was the sound of lots of closet doors slamming shut in a huff. ''Brokeback Mountain," the so-called gay cowboy movie, lost to ''Crash," a drama about the shrieking, teary, hateful, and guilty people who refuse to stop running into each on the streets of Los Angeles.

Some movies are born political, and others have politics thrust upon them. Poor ''Brokeback Mountain" was such a movie. Ang Lee's adaptation of Annie Proulx's short story was not out to attack us with a statement. It really is just an unhappy love story that happens to have enormous social relevance because its protagonists are two men. Yet the movie's biggest supporters may have turned an otherwise innocent film into a cause that got on voters' nerves. The dialogue became quotable, and the poster was mocked, lessening the emotional seriousness and making for a once-in-a-lifetime pop-culture phenomenon.

''Crash," which many Los Angelenos have come to regard as gospel, was the logical beneficiary.

As Oscar host Jon Stewart pointed out, half of Hollywood acted in ''Crash," and actors make up the Academy's largest branch. Plus, the average age of voters is rumored to be 60-something, which means that ''Crash" might have triggered a civil-rights hot flash in the Academy.

Despite the interlocking story lines, ''Crash" is in its way a conventional social-problem drama that also appealed to voters' sense of laziness. The movie is set in their backyard. And the depiction of nonstop racial strife might have tapped into some voters' guilt about their own wealth and their own prejudices.

Sandra Bullock, as a pampered politician's wife, and Matt Dillon, as a racist LAPD officer, follow particularly improbable trajectories from bigotry to enlightenment: Each dares to hug a person of color. In the case of Bullock's character, it's her Latina maid, who exists solely for this grotesque expression of guilt.

''Crash" edges to the brink of insanity then assures you, ''If we can't all get along, the least we can do is try." Maybe the puppets in the Broadway musical ''Avenue Q" said it best when they sang, ''Everyone's a little bit racist sometimes." ''Crash" turns that declaration into volcanic melodrama.

Oddly, the characters doing all the colliding in ''Crash" are straight. Director and co-writer Paul Haggis was sure to populate his movie Noah's Ark-style, with two or three members of various races, ethnicities, and social classes represented. Homosexuals didn't make the cut.

Thus the win for ''Crash" makes an interesting point about where Hollywood stands on the whole gay issue -- less ''I wish I knew how to quit you" and more ''not that there's anything wrong with that."

Throughout Oscar night, winners gave eloquent shout-outs to tolerance. George Clooney pointed out that Hattie McDaniel won her award at a time when it was dangerous and unfashionable to reward talented African-Americans.

A truly bracing acceptance speech, though, would demand acceptance of openly gay actors instead of congratulating a breakthrough that goes back six decades. Yes, there might not be a Halle Berry without Hattie McDaniel. But suddenly it's more reasonable to wonder when we'll ever see a gay McDaniel.

It's fine for Hollywood to urge gay tolerance. But it should give America an actual homosexual to tolerate first.

The defeat of ''Brokeback" exposes this blind spot all too clearly. Best-director winner Ang Lee praised the fictional ''cowboys" in his movie for their bravery. But the real -- and truly audacious -- Truman Capote went unthanked in best actor winner Philip Seymour Hoffman's acceptance speech.

The culture of the movie business isn't all that different from the military or sports. An accusation of homosexuality can turn a star litigious or, in some cases, relentlessly straight. Obviously, the movies are in the business of illusion. And anything that shatters the illusion is bad for business.

As this year's Oscars demonstrated, Hollywood will find a way to produce or distribute ''Capote," ''Brokeback Mountain," and ''Transamerica," but fosters an environment in which the lead parts in those movies have to be played by ostensibly straight actors. There are no gay film stars. We all know the gay actors go to Broadway (they want Tonys!) or come from England. Seriously people, Ian McKellen can't do all your work for you.

In any case, ''Brokeback Mountain" might not have been stridently political enough for Academy voters. The heroes never even say the word ''gay." ''Crash" throws all its issues up on the screen; of course it won. The Academy can congratulate itself from the bottom of its heart, while claiming to have searched its soul for solutions to decades of African-American neglect. Halle Berry, Denzel Washington, Jamie Foxx, Morgan Freeman, and now Three 6 Mafia are recent winners. There are lots of African-American stars and producers. Black is pretty normal in the movies.

Homosexuality? Not so much.

In an attempt to ''normalize" ''Brokeback Mountain" during Sunday night's broadcast Stewart trotted out a montage of great homoerotic moments in Westerns. It put the movie in an irreverent cinematic context, and it was very funny until you realized that, because the men in the montage aren't truly gay, all that clip reel actually does is reinforce paranoia about what seems gay. Just like the ''Brokeback" parodies sprouting all over the Internet, it was a backhanded compliment -- progressive, yet misleading, true but false, distancing and distorted.

In the very same way that straight Stewart happily woke up in bed with straight Clooney during one of Sunday night's skits, it was more insidiously coy illusion. Smirking and winking pussyfoots around the issue. Waking up beside Harvey Fierstein and loving it -- that's pushing the envelope.
 
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Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #78 on: Mar 09, 2006, 10:31 PM »

Crash: Worst Movie of the Year[/b]

Richard Kim, The Nation,  March 6, 2006

The Nation -- As a film studies major I've been trained to sit through any cinematic experience -- from Andy Warhol's 8-hour long Empire (yes, 8 consecutive hours of the Empire State Building in real time) to Derek Jarman's Blue (an hour plus of an unchanging blue screen dramatizing Jarman's AIDS-related blindness) -- and never abandon ship (incidentally I loved both films). It took all this training and more to endure this year's Academy Award winner for Best Picture, Crash, which I saw this summer in, alas, its entirety. I've already written about how I'm not a huge fan of Brokeback Mountain, the other Oscar contender, but it's definitely a better film than Crash, which I would have walked out on had it not been for my stalwart companions.

White critics like Roger Ebert, who proclaimed it the best film of the year, and David Denby of the New Yorker loved it. Denby wrote that it "makes previous movie treatments of prejudice seem like easy and self-congratulatory liberalizing."

I couldn't disagree more; easy and self-congratulatory liberalizing is the epitome of the film. To my mind, Crash's central message is: There's a lot of racism in the world, but it's all rendered meaningless by a magical force. This force is called sheer coincidence. I'll happily spoil the denouement for anyone who hasn't seen it. The racist white cop (Matt Dillon) sexually molests a black women (Thandie Newton), but is really a good guy because he saves her from a car crash (oh, and because he loves his ailing poppy). His partner's (Ryan Phillipe) anti-racist protests are really irrelevant because he ends up killing an innocent black teenager (Larenz Tate). Meanwhile, a rich, racist white woman (Sandra Bullock) unfairly suspects a Latino locksmith (Michael Pena) of being a crook, but it's okay because her Latino maid (and best friend) takes care of her when she injures herself. And on and on and on through a "compassionate conservative" rainbow of cast members each with their own neatly moralistic (but totally individualized) racial melodramas. As with the well-awarded musical Avenue Q, the moral of Crash is: Don't worry, everyone's a little bit racist.

Anyway, my amateur film criticism aside, you'll find a good dissection of Crash by sometime Nation writer Jeff Chang and Sylvia Chan over at Alternet. LA Weekly critic Scott Foundas called it the worst film of the year. I agree.

« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2006, 08:47 AM by hidesert »

Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #79 on: Mar 09, 2006, 10:35 PM »

Gay-themed films riding 'Brokeback' coattails[/b]

By Gregg Goldstein   Associated Press  March 10, 2006

"Brokeback Mountain" might not have earned the best picture Academy Award, but with three Oscars to its name, including Ang Lee's win as best director, the gay-cowboy romance may have more impact on Hollywood than any other of this year's nominees.

Having already earned $127 million worldwide, the Focus Features release is expected to pave the way for more gay-themed films, and in its wake, other projects about gay characters that have long languished in development are suddenly looking more viable.

"'Brokeback' tells people who are risk-phobic that you can get good actors to appear in your film and you can make money," said novelist Peter Lefcourt, who is attempting to revive one such gay project. "If they're convinced of that, they'll finance the movie."

Patricia Neil Warren's 1974 novel "The Front Runner," about a track coach's affair with a team member, is one of the longest-gestating gay-themed projects in Hollywood. Although the novel has sold more than 10 million copies, the film version has had a tortured history ever since Paul Newman optioned it for a year in 1975. Since then, a series of producers held the rights, which returned to Warren three years ago.

"People in the industry look at gay-themed films as low budget, but the problem with 'The Front Runner' is it's set at the Olympic games," said Warren, who's been offered budgets of $2 million or less for the project. "That would reduce the story to one little college track meet and the love scene," she said, while looking for a "Brokeback"-size $13 million-$15 million budget. But now, she's getting the most interest she's seen in more than 32 years, she said. "As the box office figures (for "Brokeback") grow, we get more calls," she said.

Two other projects in the development stage for about 15 years are the biopic of slain San Francisco Mayor Harvey Milk, "The Mayor of Castro Street," and an adaptation of Lefcourt's 1992 novel "The Dreyfus Affair: A Love Story," a satirical look at two baseball players who fall for each other.

"Mayor" has been shepherded by producers Neil Meron and Craig Zadan, who at one point had gotten director Oliver Stone to commit and set it up at Warner Bros. Pictures, with Robin Williams attached to star. "Then Oliver got attacked by gay groups over his portrayal of gay characters in 'JFK' and said, 'I just can't go into another project and go through that again,"' Zadan said.

Williams soon left, too, and the project bounced from such directors as Gus Van Sant to a host of screenwriters. "We were never really able to crack the script, and we finally realized it was more important not to make the movie if it wasn't right," Meron said.

Helmer Bryan Singer came onto the project last year. According to Zadan, Singer's now interviewing "very high level" screenwriters and should have one on board within a month. Although Singer joined the project before "Brokeback" came to life, "You feel there's a new energy around movies of this ilk."

Lefcourt had a similarly rocky road with his best-seller. Two producers at the Walt Disney Co. picked it up almost immediately after its publication. It was dropped, then picked up again at Disney, where, Lefcourt suspects, its chances were hurt because Disney owned the California Angels "and the story turns Major League Baseball into a villain." Reps from Jodie Foster and Barbra Streisand's production companies expressed interest before director Betty Thomas got 20th Century Fox to option it. But Fox eventually let it go, and Thomas took the project to New Line Cinema, where, according to Lefcourt, Ben Affleck was set to star before deciding to make "Pearl Harbor" instead.

The project remained quiet until a few months ago, when producer Andrew Lang picked up the option, with Lefcourt now writing a new script. "From conversations we've had, there's no apprehension from studios or agencies," Lang said. "The success of 'Brokeback' has opened a lot of doors. People are realizing gay themes aren't as much of an issue as they once thought."

On the horizon, Meron and Zadan also are producing out baseball player Billy Bean's autobiography "Going All the Way" with TV producer/director Alan Poul.

The project was set up at Showtime but dropped as the pay network focused more on series development. The producers are now in active negotiations with another cable network, talking with stars and directors, and anticipate filming this year.

More mainstream projects with gay and lesbian themes are coming soon, from the spring's Miramax Films cross-dressing comedy "Kinky Boots" to Universal Pictures' Adam Sandler-Kevin James comedy "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry," about a pair of straight firefighters who pose as domestic partners to get health benefits, set for production in August.

With "Brokeback" at the heart of this year's awards race -- the movie's infamous pup tent even served as a setup for the opening joke of Sunday's Oscar broadcast -- Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation spokesman Damon Romine said of the movie's impact, "We're visible in a way we've never been before. Even if you haven't seen 'Brokeback,' the conversation has begun. It's gotten people to debate, and at the end of the day, it's changing hearts and minds."


Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #80 on: Mar 10, 2006, 12:54 AM »

The Year that Oscar Blinked[/b]

This year's mystifying awards for Best Picture and Best Original Song are signs that Hollywood's artistic compass is broken.

Syl Jones, Minneapolis Star-Tribune   March 10,2006

Now that Paul Haggis' film "Crash" has captured Oscars for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay, African-Americans across the nation will have to endure inane conversations with naïve whites that begin, "Oh, I just loved that movie!" The scornful response, "Yeah, and I hated it because the movie engineers a paint-by-the-numbers view of racial prejudice," is further proof that Hollywood remains the bastion of left-footed, hoof-in-mouth liberalism it has always been.

2006 will forever be remembered as the year that Oscar blinked. "Crash" is artistically inferior in virtually every way to "Capote,"Good Night and Good Luck" and of course "Brokeback Mountain." But because that carefully crafted film made the homoeroticism of the cult of the cowboy explicit, Hollywood didn't want to go there.

By contrast, "Crash" is a sloppy piece of workmanship, a kind of PowerPoint presentation about race that is absurd on its face. But "Crash" is also cleverly constructed to reassure white audiences that all people have racial and ethnic biases and that white America bears no special historical racial burden. This naively balanced view of race relations is the film's main conceit. However, there can be no bona fide balanced view of race relations in America, where generations of white privilege have embedded a special kind of race-based dominance into our culture and history.

But let's do what most Americans do -- let's forget about our history. Let's begin inside this film with the near-hysteria of the character played by Thandie Newton, an upper-middle-class black woman who comes apart at the seams when she is groped by a racist police officer. White audiences seemed to think her response was credible, but most African-American audiences know better. No upper-middle-class black woman in her right mind would react by screaming and swearing at an armed member of the Los Angeles Police Department in that situation. Newton's hysterical black female caricature is simply this generation's version of Prissy, ripped from yet another fantasy about race called "Gone With the Wind."

Turns out that the racist cop in "Crash" is not only nursing a sick old dad at home (bless his soul), but also ends up risking his life in a rescue involving the same black woman he previously groped. Isn't that incredible? It's as if there's only one squad car in the entire LAPD, one hysterical black woman, one racist cop with a heart of gold, and one giant agenda driving the film toward its inevitable rear-ending.

That's just the beginning of the film's problems. Each of the set pieces has a pretentiousness all its own. We are asked to believe that Sandra Bullock, who treats her Latina maid with derision throughout the picture, somehow sees the light and embraces her as a friend at the end. We're asked to accept the idea that two young black men would hijack a Lincoln Navigator in broad daylight because, hey, that's what they do when they're not having profound conversations about black-on-black crime.

The film also intentionally blurs the line between personal prejudice and systemic racism. When the black detective character played by Don Cheadle is offered a promotion and a clean record for his petty criminal of a little brother if he will simply withhold crucial evidence in another case, the offer is made by a white superior on the basis of affirmative action. This pivotal scene is cynically presented as "just another example" of everyday racism when it's a much more sophisticated and systemic hustle than that. Assuming you can believe that it might have happened, which I don't.

As if all of this weren't enough, Hollywood's political correctness agenda got an extra boost when it awarded the Best Original Song Oscar to "It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp," a rhythm track masquerading as a song. Dolly Parton's "Travelin' Through" clearly deserved the honor, but Academy members weren't basing these particular judgments on artistic merit.

Both of these awards send strong messages that Hollywood's artistic compass is busted but good. "Brokeback Mountain" is an enduring story that accurately portrays the problems inherent in any love relationship: It's hard, it's painful, and the social context in which we love may lead to death and disillusionment. Long after we are gone, future audiences will wonder how such a stunning achievement could have been overlooked for the Best Picture award.

Meanwhile, here's a warning for those who think they have learned a thing or two about race relations now that "Crash" has schooled them: Please don't try to test the white male fantasy at the core of this movie in the real world. You're likely to quickly discover that Hollywood is a lot closer to Disneyland than you think.

Syl Jones, Minnetonka, is a playwright, journalist and corporate communications consultant.


 

Offline ethan

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #81 on: Mar 10, 2006, 01:06 AM »
hidesert, thanks so much for posting these articles. So interesting to read.  :D
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed

Offline hidesert

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #82 on: Mar 10, 2006, 09:08 AM »

You're welcome Ethan.   

Roger Ebert has been defending "Crash" for a long time.  Earlier Ebert criticized Scott Foundas of LA Weekly for tagging "Crash" as one the worst films of 2005.  This is Foundas's reply to Ebert:


Roger and Me[/b]      

Written by SCOTT FOUNDAS    January 18, 2006    

Scott Foundas responds to Ebert’s critic-bait
   
Dear Roger:

Save for the storied contretemps between Pauline Kael and Andrew Sarris, film critics are generally far too busy reviewing the new movies that open each week to spend much time reviewing each other. So I was understandably surprised to read your January 8 Chicago Sun-Times editorial “In Defense of the ‘Worst Movie of the Year,’” in which you lambasted my opinion of Crash, a movie you have repeatedly praised as being the best of 2005. Specifically, you were referring to comments I made in the recent Movie Club forum at Slate.com — a discussion about the past year in film that also included contributions by critics A.O. Scott of The New York Times, Jonathan Rosenbaum of the Chicago Reader and Slate’s own David Edelstein. As your headline suggests, I wrote in the forum that Crash was among my least favorite movies of 2005 and called it “one of those self-congratulatory liberal jerk-off movies that roll around every once in a while to remind us of how white people suffer too, how nobody is without his prejudices, and how, when the going gets tough, even the white-supremacist cop who gets his kicks from sexually harassing innocent black motorists is capable of rising to the occasion.”

I stand by those words and, as you point out, I am not alone in such sentiments. Your essay quotes negative Crash reviews by MSNBC critic Dave White and even the editor of your own Web site, Jim Emerson. To which I would add that, upon its release back in May, Crash received mixed-to-negative reviews from Edelstein in Slate and Scott in The New York Times, as well as from many other critics writing in the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek and The New Republic, among other publications. In the 2005 Village Voice poll of more than 100 major North American critics, Crash was cited by only four participants as one of the year’s ten best films, for an overall 66th-place showing in the survey. And lest anyone surmise that this amounts to some sort of contrarian backlash against a widely praised film, I should note that way back during the 2004 Toronto Film Festival, three-quarters of a year before Crash arrived in commercial cinemas, Variety critic Todd McCarthy wrote that the movie offers “a narrow, ungenerous and, finally, unrepresentative view of the world, one that suggests people are correct in suspecting others as having only the worst motives.”

I couldn’t have put it better myself, but maybe you, Roger, could have. In describing Crash, you’ve written: “A white racist cop sexually assaults a black woman, then the next day saves her life. His white partner, a rookie, is appalled by his behavior, but nevertheless later kills an innocent man because he leaps to a conclusion based on race. A black man is so indifferent to his girlfriend’s Latino heritage that he can’t be bothered to remember where she’s from. After a carjacking, a liberal politician’s wife insists all their locks be changed — and then wants them changed again, because she thinks the Mexican-American locksmith will send his “homies” over with the pass key. The same locksmith has trouble with an Iranian store owner who thinks the Mexican-American is black. But it drives the Iranian crazy that everyone thinks he is Arab, when they should know that Iranians are Persian. Buying a gun to protect himself, he gets into a shouting match with a gun dealer who has a lot of prejudices about, yes, Arabs.” That, in a nutshell, is as succinct a summary as I’ve read of everything that’s wrong with this picture. If only you’d managed to mention that the two carjackers who, when they’re not perpetrating grand theft auto, engage in animated debates about black-on-black racism and hip-hop as “music of the oppressor” — scenes aptly described by the name of one of the actors featured in them: Ludacris. (To answer your rhetorical question, Roger: If I were carjacked at gunpoint by these two guys, I wouldn’t “rise to the occasion with measured detachment and sardonic wit.” I’d merely wait for Ashton Kutcher to appear and tell me I’d been punk’d.)

I’ve said that Crash, which was co-written and directed by Paul Haggis, doesn’t accurately reflect the city of Los Angeles as I’ve come to know it after more than a decade of living here (during which time I’ve made lots of meaningful connections with others, none of which have been the result of a car accident). But as I think back on the film, I’m not even sure that it reflects life as we know it on planet Earth. The characters in Crash don’t feel like three-dimensional, flesh-and-blood human beings so much as calculated “types” plugged by Haggis into a schematic thesis about how we are all, in the course of any given day, the perpetrators and the victims of some racial prejudice. (Nobody in Haggis’ universe is allowed to be merely one or the other.) They have no inner lives. They fail to exist independently of whatever stereotype they’re on hand to embody and/or debunk. Erudite carjackers? A man who can’t remember his own girlfriend’s ethnicity? You may see such things as “parables,” but I call it sloppy, sanctimonious screenwriting of the kind that, as one colleague recently suggested, should be studied in film classes as a prime example of what not to do.

But then, Roger, perhaps all of us detractors are simply, as you put it, “too cool for the room.” According to you, we critics must bear in mind “the ways in which real people see real films,” the same people who you say enjoy paying to be manipulated. (And who’s to argue, when the officials currently holding our nation’s highest elected offices offer living proof that many of us enjoy being manipulated for free?) You go on to say that you’ve talked to dozens of viewers who were touched by Crash, and while I don’t deny that, I have had my own conversations about Crash with plenty of “real people” who feel less touched by the film than manhandled by it. Among e-mails I’ve received from Slate readers, one goes so far as to speculate that people are afraid to admit they don’t like Crash for fear of being considered racists themselves — and I think the film is engineered to make viewers feel that way — while another, somewhat more charitable correspondent quotes Oscar Wilde’s maxim that “all bad art is sincere.”

Finally, you express surprise that anyone could feel contempt toward a movie like Crash in the same year that witnessed the release of Chaos and Deuce Bigalow, European Gigolo. But as I stated in Slate, by calling Crash the worst movie of the year, I don’t mean to suggest that it’s entirely incompetent or even a catastrophic all-star debacle on the order of The Bonfire of the Vanities or Town & Country. No, Crash asks (and expects) to be taken much too seriously for that kind of rote dismissal. So, why contrast Crash against two unrepentant, bottom-of-the-barrel stinkers — one a no-budget horror movie that took pride in using bad reviews as part of its promotional campaign and the other a lowbrow Rob Schneider comedy — rather than placing it in the context of those other movies from 2005 that so much more subtly and intelligently (and no less sincerely) grappled with the effects of race and class on our daily lives? I’m thinking, of course, of Michael Haneke’s brilliant Caché — my own pick for the best film of last year — and also about George Romero’s Land of the Dead, both of which are studies in how (mostly white) people of privilege attempt to seal themselves off from society’s “undesirable” elements (who just so happen to be people of color). And while we’re on the subject, I might as well mention Lars von Trier’s soon-to-be-released Manderlay, which premiered at festivals in 2005, and is about the very kind of psychological enslavement that might lead a group called the African-American Film Critics Association to present Crash with a best-picture award.

Haggis is right about one thing: None of us is without prejudice. You’re right that in my notes on Crash, I neglect to mention the name of the actor who plays the Mexican-American locksmith; in your editorial, you say with the utmost certainty that “when two white cops stop you for the wrong reason and one starts feeling up your wife, it is prudent to reflect that both of the cops are armed and, if you resist, in court you will hear that you pulled a gun, were carrying cocaine, threatened them, and are lying about the sexual assault.” These are indeed troubled waters, but if Crash is what qualifies as “a bridge towards tolerance,” excuse me while I phone my auto-insurance agent and increase my premium.

Sincerely, Scott Foundas


Offline tpe

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #83 on: Mar 10, 2006, 09:27 AM »

You're welcome Ethan.   

Roger Ebert has been defending "Crash" for a long time.  Earlier Ebert criticized Scott Foundas of LA Weekly for tagging "Crash" as one the worst films of 2005.  This is Foundas's reply to Ebert:


Roger and Me[/b]      



Scott Foundas, thou art a mirror of wit... and truth.

Offline quentin751

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #84 on: Mar 10, 2006, 02:03 PM »
ive seen "crash" and really like it! I dont remember thandie newton going mad when she was touched by the racist cop( matt dilon) so i dont understand the post above.. i dont see steroetypes there, or if is welle let s admit we are sometimes sterteotypes!
i know its not the subject here but if anyone had seen "crash" and disliked it please help me to understand...

Offline tpe

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #85 on: Mar 10, 2006, 02:07 PM »
ive seen "crash" and really like it! I dont remember thandie newton going mad when she was touched by the racist cop( matt dilon) so i dont understand the post above.. i dont see steroetypes there, or if is welle let s admit we are sometimes sterteotypes!
i know its not the subject here but if anyone had seen "crash" and disliked it please help me to understand...

I did not like it.  Because it is not subtle.  It is not life.  It is not art.

Offline Lost_Girl

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YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW BAD IT GETS !!!!

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Offline chameau

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #87 on: Mar 10, 2006, 04:35 PM »
I voted...

Michelle is equal to Rachel  :o
Jake beats them all  8)
Heath is number one  8)
Ang is number one  8)
BBM is number one  8)

Yesss!  ;D
La dictature c'est ''ferme ta geule'', la démocratie c'est ''cause toujours''
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Offline bbmlover

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #88 on: Mar 10, 2006, 04:51 PM »
ive seen "crash" and really like it! I dont remember thandie newton going mad when she was touched by the racist cop( matt dilon) so i dont understand the post above.. i dont see steroetypes there, or if is welle let s admit we are sometimes sterteotypes!
i know its not the subject here but if anyone had seen "crash" and disliked it please help me to understand...

I did not like it.  Because it is not subtle.  It is not life.  It is not art.

i'am with you on this - tpe. Count my vote.

Offline bnjmn3

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Re: Post-Oscar news coverage
« Reply #89 on: Mar 10, 2006, 05:05 PM »
You reference to Thandie is when she is in the flipped car.  If you really want to see BAFTA Winner Thandie in action get a copy of Beloved.
I just sat through Crash for the first time...I am preparing to discuss the film in detail. I will look for the appropriate thread.
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