Author Topic: Reviews ----- International  (Read 5092 times)

Offline *Froggy*

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Reviews ----- International
« on: Jan 01, 2006, 05:32 PM »
Just found this on the Net...
 
Abstract:
Ang Lee's imposing, beautifully judged film has a depth of feeling all too rare in modern cinema. Slow-moving and understated, it builds into a soulful heartbreaker that rests lightly on the shoulders of two exceptional performances from Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. The easy label of a gay cowboy drama barely does justice to a film suffused with sadness and tenderness that can speak to anyone who has longed for something that can never be.

http://scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com/thereview.cfm?id=282006

« Last Edit: Apr 22, 2006, 12:23 AM by ethan »
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Re: Scotland on Sunday
« Reply #1 on: Jan 01, 2006, 05:34 PM »
*Sigh* That is soooo true. And sad :'(

Offline *Froggy*

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Re: Scotland on Sunday
« Reply #2 on: Jan 01, 2006, 07:16 PM »
*Sigh* That is soooo true. And sad :'(

That's a little abstract...i really liked this review!
Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

Offline Apollonos

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Re: Scotland on Sunday
« Reply #3 on: Jan 02, 2006, 06:45 AM »
I'm very surprised to see such a glowing review in a Scottish newspaper. I thought that most Scots were very conservative, and would have expected a much more negative response; but this review was both insightful and sensitive. Gle mhath... Alba gu brath!

Offline *Froggy*

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Reviews - International
« Reply #4 on: Jan 05, 2006, 01:39 PM »
http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,14931-1970057,00.html

 The Times
January 05, 2006

Brokeback Mountain
By James Christopher




Ang Lee films bear such scant resemblance to each other that it is hard to believe that they were fashioned by the same man. Brokeback Mountain is as far removed from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon as it is possible to get. There is not a single splashy effect in this bony western, yet it is easily the most affecting cinema the Asian auteur has made.

Set in the hills of Wyoming in 1963, Brokeback Mountain tells the story of two young drifters who are hired to tend sheep in frigid isolation. Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal are chalk-and-cheese loners, and the Oscar for Best Actor is within reach of both.

Jack Twist (Gyllenhaal) and Ennis Del Mar (Ledger) barely speak a word for weeks on end. The camaraderie is as basic as their duties. One of them sleeps with the sheep, the other fries the beans. The entertainment is a mouth organ and a slug of whisky.

A freezing night sparks the guilty drama. Jack invites Ennis to share his tent. He places Ennis’s hand on his crotch and they squirm in frantic intimacy. The square-jawed Ennis wants to forget the sex ever happened. He aims to get married in November.

“That was a one-shot thing,” he mumbles. He narrows his eyes, lowers his Stetson, and trots back to the sheep. This is an unlikely cue for an epic Hollywood love story. But romances are rarely this touching, and westerns rarely this believable. The salty melodrama is how the two ranch hands fail to cope with their taboo feelings. When summer breaks, the two men are forced to part like strangers. The denial is heartbreaking.

What makes the split so painful is the way the film plays with real fire: the evasion, the fear of discovery, and rampant homophobia. Randy Quaid is terrific as the sour local boss who accidentally sees far more of the boys than he is prepared to stomach.

The miserable business of scraping a wage pushes Ennis and Jack to distant states. Years pass. Yet the romance somehow survives, mostly as a long-distance itch the two men can scratch only when they meet for “fishing trips” on Brokeback Mountain.

Repression and jealousy gnaw the marital knots they tie with Michelle Williams (as Ledger’s bitter, knowing wife) and Anne Hathaway (Gyllenhaal’s wealthy Texas squeeze). Ledger’s need to keep up appearances and Gyllenhaal’s desire to come clean, are the poisonous sticking points.

Lee wrings pure melancholy out of what might have been. The performances are magnetic. The framing scenes — Williams silently crying into her cup of coffee as Ledger packs for another male-only camping trip; Gyllenhaal seeking paid solace in the dingy streets of El Paso — are immaculately shot.

What makes the film so fresh is not the modest story, but the combination of ingredients: the period, the people, the language, the big weather. Every secret inch squeaks with authenticity. Lee uses his perspective as an “outsider” to paint the most impressive and bleak portrait of postwar rural life in the American West I’ve ever seen.
Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

Offline *Froggy*

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Reviews - International
« Reply #5 on: Jan 05, 2006, 03:57 PM »
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/films/articles/21355977?source=Evening%20Standard

Cowboys on trail of lost love
Reviewed by Derek Malcolm, Evening Standard (5 January 2006)




Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

greenfrog

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Reviews - International
« Reply #6 on: Jan 05, 2006, 11:01 PM »
http://film.guardian.co.uk/News_Story/Critic_Review/Guardian_review/0,4267,1680094,00.html

Brokeback Mountain

Here is a love story from director Ang Lee in which the taboo word "love" is never spoken. In fact the whole movie is a rich, spacious, passionate way of showing, not telling, feelings that dare not speak their name - and doing so with superb intelligence and magnificent candour. Brokeback Mountain is an adaptation of a piece of writing from 1997 by Annie Proulx that already bears the burdensome reputation of being the best short story ever to be published in the New Yorker magazine: the tale of two itinerant ranch-hands in the early 1960s, Ennis and Jack, who get a summer's work shepherding on Brokeback Mountain in Wyoming. They are played here by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal.

Thrown together, lonely and frustrated, Ennis and Jack find that their relationship has grown deeper and fiercer than friendship and they have sex. It is a glorious, revelatory experience, and safe from society's disapproval on that remote Arcadian spot they are at one with their own natures and with nature itself. And for the rest of their lives, unhappily married with children, meeting every few years as notional buddies for furtive "fishing trips", they yearn to recapture that brief shining moment of happiness and truth.
Beautifully composed and wonderfully acted, this film is massively superior to the last Proulx adaptation - the woeful Shipping News - and far better than Ang Lee's last cowboy movie, his very moderate civil war drama Ride With the Devil. Most literary adaptations are crushed, concertina-ed affairs in which a novel's various chapters, scenes and characters are squeezed out. A short story is different, and this movie gives you the feeling of wings being spread, not clipped. There is a real sense here that the dimensions and space of the film have been stretched, and screenwriters Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana have developed and extrapolated the source material with flair, in particular giving a dramatic presence to the women in Ennis and Jack's story. The wives are destined to be baffled and hurt, and crucially realise that it is they, and not their menfolk, who are expected to live out their lives in a state of denial.

If anyone is the seducer it is Jack, played by Gyllenhaal, whose performance - along with his presence in Sam Mendes's forthcoming Gulf war movie Jarhead - shows that he has matured into one of the most charismatic actors of his generation. Jack is a rodeo rider, a guy who lopes and mopes around fairs most of his professional life in exchange for a few seconds of thrashing ecstatically on the back of a bucking steer before being painfully and all too quickly thrown off. The sexual metaphor is not, however, laboured, and Jack's attempts to draw out the laconic, strong-and-silent Ennis are not predatory but open-hearted and good-natured. Ennis himself is a humble ranch-hand by trade, only doing the job so that he can make enough cash to marry his sweetheart Alma (Michelle Williams) and, as he fiercely tells Jack, he "ain't no queer". After their first sex, Ennis grimly heads off to his sheep, getting into a habit of making work an alibi for non-commitment that will last him for the rest of his life.

The release of this film has already been accompanied by a debate about how new and groundbreaking it is, and whether or not there has always been a gay subtext to cowboy movies. I would be a millionaire if I had 50p for every time someone mentioned Montgomery Clift and John Ireland admiring each other's pistols in Howard Hawks's 1948 western Red River. Unfortunately, this insight is often exaggerated to tease those reactionary homophobes who often claim exclusive custody of the western, and leaves unanswered the question of how or whether hints of homoeroticism are more authentic than overt stories of heterosexual friendship. The conventions of cowboy life and the bunkhouse were socially created circumstances in which gay identity could be invisible, but Brokeback Mountain is surely new in courageously removing invisibility's cloak, in removing the sub- from the subtext, and asking how gay men can exist without living a lie, a question that has not disappeared in 2006.

It is a desperately sad story in many ways, a story of two wasted lives, but a beautiful and moving story, too. Jake becomes a sellout, working for his obnoxious father-in-law selling farm machinery, and Ennis turns into a grumpy and taciturn old cowpoke - their true selves become more poignantly inaccessible with each unsatisfactory holiday together. Further than this, Brokeback Mountain is the story of how most of our lives, gay and straight, are defined by one moment in which things go gloriously and naturally right, when everything falls into place, but which is then infected by the bacilli of wrongness. Ennis and Jack, flawed as they are, do their best to resist the encroachment of that infection; they fight not just against bigotry, but dullness and mediocrity. Their story is not tragic, but heroic.


I love the last line. So sweet and so sad at the same time.  :'(
« Last Edit: Jan 06, 2006, 03:44 AM by frog123 »

Offline Apollonos

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Terrific review from a Korean website
« Reply #7 on: Jan 06, 2006, 05:11 AM »
This beautiful review is from a Korean news website.

http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?at_code=297733

'Brokeback Mountain' Rides On Real Love
'Gay cowboy movie' a touching, human portrait that breaks barriers
by Brian Orndorf (briano) 
 
Both looking for work in 1963, cowboys Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhall) and Ennis Del Mar (Heath Ledger) are paired up and sent to Brokeback Mountain to help herd sheep for the summer. Finding an easygoing friendship based on mutual hardship, the relationship gets complicated quickly when Jack takes Ennis into his tent one cold night, and the two take their companionship to the next level.

Unable to deal with their love for each other, the men reluctantly go their separate ways, eventually finding wives (Michelle Williams and Anne Hathaway) and siring children over the years, but still processing the deep, complex love between them. Periodically reconnecting during visits and getaways, it becomes clear that the difficulty of trying to accept their feelings might eventually unravel them for good.

   
©2005 Paramount
Out of a very unexpected place, director Ang Lee has created one of the most affecting romances of the year, along with one of the best pictures. Uncompromising, touching, and surprising, "Brokeback Mountain" crosses all gender and political lines and fashions a demonstrative story about people, not agendas.

Set against the mountains and prairies of Canada (subbing for Wyoming), "Brokeback" is a lush and visually stupendous western, carefully paced so Lee can get the audience used to the detailed movement of the story. There is great care in depicting the splendor of the titular location, almost reaching a point in which the unspoiled lands are as profoundly moving as the story. Assisting Lee with the script (along with Diana Ossana) is co-writer Larry McMurtry ("Lonesome Dove") who lends the film a strong cowboy pedigree in the day-to-day business that Jack and Ennis attend to.

As the nights grow colder, "Brokeback" starts to untangle the love story between the main characters; Lee doesn't soft-pedal their sexual adventures, rendering Jack and Ennis almost gladiatorial in the way they forcefully seduce each other. What starts as seemingly furious shoving and wrestling ends up quite the opposite, allowing for a realistic portrayal of confusion and denial, especially on Ennis's part, who is mystified by his own urges. "Brokeback" isn't graphic, and that never seems part of Lee's design. He's making an emotional film, not a button pushing one, which wraps the viewer up tighter into the story.

Miraculously, the script doesn't waste a moment furthering the mental condition of the characters, efficiently detailing over 20 years worth of growth and neglect in just over two hours. Lee and his editors create a gentle flow to the picture that weaves in and out of heartbreak as Jack and Ennis grow older and lead increasingly complicated lives.

Their hearts lie on the mountain, but their responsibilities and fear keep them apart. Lee refuses melodrama and consistently reaches for the most honest, emotionally truthful feeling in every scene. Much like the rodeo bulls Jack rides on the side for money, Lee is faced with a difficult picture that attempts to buck him at every opportunity, yet he always maintains control. "Brokeback" is an incredible piece of direction, even for Lee, who has made a career out of impressive cinema.

While the performances are uniformly fantastic, nothing can quite prepare the mind for the work that Heath Ledger provides. As an actor prone to overcompensating, Ledger's Ennis is a man of decidedly few words, yet is a thunderstorm of heartache on the inside. This is quite literally a full-bodied performance, using all of Ledger as Ennis thrashes about watching his life fall apart due to his self-loathing, distance, and towering regret.

Unable to give himself over to his feelings, Ennis's heart withers and dies, only witnessing moments of happiness with Jack, which allows him to be the man he wants to be without fear of judgment. Saying Ledger is Oscar-worthy here isn't strong enough: this is a career-best performance, and a crucial element to the necessary feeling of frustration that powers the film.

As the years flow by, and Jack and Ennis try to determine what they mean to each other, "Brokeback" stops being the "gay cowboy film," and begins to represent real love by any standard or example. The film is about long-term connection between humans, in ways most mainstream Hollywood productions have long since abandoned. "Brokeback Mountain" is an intimate story of affection, but it decimates the heart with passion and clarity.

Offline tpe

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Re: Rave review from The Guardian
« Reply #8 on: Jan 06, 2006, 09:14 AM »
http://film.guardian.co.uk/News_Story/Critic_Review/Guardian_review/0,4267,1680094,00.html

It is a glorious, revelatory experience, and safe from society's disapproval on that remote Arcadian spot they are at one with their own natures and with nature itself.

ET IN ARCADIA EGO

Offline sweetlilg

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Re: Rave review from The Guardian
« Reply #9 on: Jan 07, 2006, 02:12 PM »
thanks for posting!
"Sometimes I miss you SO MUCH I can hardly stand it" - Jack <3

RIP Heath ♥ Heath, I swear...

BrokeBack Mountain is the BEST! It has won the Oscar of my heart!

Offline *Froggy*

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Re: Rave review from The Guardian
« Reply #10 on: Jan 07, 2006, 04:40 PM »
Here is a love story from director Ang Lee in which the taboo word "love" is never spoken.
:'( If only!

Thankx for the article
Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

Offline Apollonos

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Re: Rave review from The Guardian
« Reply #11 on: Jan 09, 2006, 03:01 AM »
Froggie,

Don't feel bad. Actions speak louder than words, and Jake and Ennis' actions speak VOLUMES in our beloved BBM!

greenfrog

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Re: Rave review from The Guardian
« Reply #12 on: Jan 09, 2006, 05:58 PM »
Here is a love story from director Ang Lee in which the taboo word "love" is never spoken.
:'( If only!

Thankx for the article

Your welcome froggy.  8)

Offline brokebackmountain

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Reviews - International
« Reply #13 on: Jan 14, 2006, 03:34 AM »
Reviews International
Born from their love..forever bound by ours.

Offline flikker2005

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Re: Reviews ----- International - BBC - 5 Stars
« Reply #14 on: Jan 18, 2006, 09:16 PM »
FIVE STAR rating from the BBC film review. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/films/2005/12/16/brokeback_mountain_2005_review.shtml

Reviewed by Stella Papamichael
Updated 05 January 2006   
Contains strong language, moderate sex and violence   
   

While the notion of gay cowboys may induce some sniggering in the back row, Brokeback Mountain is a masterclass in subtle directing. That's not to say Ang Lee shies away from sex; indeed the passion between the lovers is shockingly brutal. But it's a testament to his sensitive handling, and fearlessly vulnerable performances by Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger, that this love story between two ranch hands stands for something essentially human. It is both raw and exquisite.

In 1963 the sexual revolution has yet to hit Wyoming where the taciturn Ennis (Ledger) and extrovert Jack (Gyllenhaal) are thrown together on a sheep-herding job. When camaraderie develops into something more intimate, the script (based on Annie Proulx's short story) leans towards Ennis and his struggle to reconcile his feelings with resignation to "the way things are". Years pass and both men marry and have children, but denial of their bond only makes it stronger.

"ACHING CLAUSTROPHOBIA"

Ennis' ambiguity bleeds through the story with quiet foreboding. Each time he rebuffs Jack, he slips deeper within himself and Ledger plays it in every physical gesture - literally hunched in the shadow of his Stetson. In some ways Gyllenhaal is more sympathetic as the incorrigible optimist, but there is always an aching claustrophobia about their predicament, poignantly offset by sweeping mountain vistas. The images reflect the heartbreak and beauty of a tortured love affair and, without resorting to pat sentimentality, Lee builds to a stirring and soulful finale. Brokeback Mountain is a truly epic romance story from a director at the peak of his powers.

End Credits

Director: Ang Lee

Writer: Larry McMurtry, Diana Ossana

Stars: Jake Gyllenhaal, Heath Ledger, Michelle Williams, Anne Hathaway, Randy Quaid

Genre: Drama, Romance, Western

Length: 134 minutes

Cinema: 06 January 2006

Country: USA





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