Author Topic: Oscar Nomination Basics  (Read 4435 times)

Offline hidesert

  • Alma
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
  • Gender: Male
Oscar Nomination Basics
« on: Jan 22, 2006, 12:27 PM »
From yesterday's LA Times, an article on nomination ballots and what ballots look like.  The ballots were due yesterday, January 21st at 5 pm.


A Primer on Oscar Ballots

Random facts and figures about the Academy Awards nominating ballots, which are due back at PricewaterhouseCoopers by 5 p.m. this afternoon:

The best picture ballots are white, and are to be returned in green envelopes.  Other categories, all of which are sent back in buff-colored envelopes, are color-coded to facilitate easy sorting:

Acting awards: taupe
Art direction: cream
Cinematography: pink
Costume design: gold
Directing: gray
Film editing: yellow
Original score: green
Sound mixing: blue
Writing: orange

(The categories not listed use special committees or bake-offs to select nominees, which means they lose out on the color-coded mailings.)

Photo: A set of Oscar nominating ballots shows off the subdued rainbow of colors that helps the accountants separate votes by category.

Each ballot contains a one-paragraph description of the preferential system of counting votes, to encourage members to vote for the candidates of their choice and not worry about wasting votes.

Acting ballots require voters to fill in the name of the performer and the film; in all other categories, voters simply write the film title, and the academy determines the individuals responsible.

The acting ballots also contain a short history lesson in the creation of the supporting categories, and a note that branch members must make up their own minds about the category in which a performance belongs.

Then the ballots add this note: "It is hoped that you will disregard advertising tactics designed to influence your vote and cast your ballot based solely on your own judgment.  While considerations of sentiment may be present, please keep in mind that the primary purpose of the awards is to encourage and honor the highest artistic standards of our profession."

The ballots all come accompanied by lists of eligible films in each category.  In most categories, the same 311 movies eligible for best picture remain in the running.  In some cases, however, fewer films are eligible,  often because the documentaries on the master list don't qualify in other categories;  "March of the Penguins," for instance, is hardly in the running for costume design.

On the shorter lists, 271 films are eligible for art direction and 256 for costume design.  In the writing categories, the academy has found 119 eligible adapted screenplays and 170 original screenplays.

In the best score category, which demands "a substantial body of music in the form of original dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer," only 80 films were ruled eligible.  (A typical disqualification was "The New World," in which director Terrence Malick relied too heavily on passages from Wagner and Mozart for James Horner's score to qualify.)

Ballots in the original score category contain an admonition that reads, "Do not be influenced by the songs when voting in this category.  Only the dramatic underscore is eligible."  The warning was, perhaps, more necessary in the early 1990s, when animated Disney musicals routinely won in the category, than it has been in recent years.

None of the other categories caution voters about their choices, but they all point out that voting for the same movie more than once doesn't help.

Offline *Froggy*

  • Jack + Ennis
  • *
  • Posts: 10977
  • Gender: Female
  • No longer using this account: frog123
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #1 on: Jan 22, 2006, 12:31 PM »
Wow that was interesting!

Thankx for posting  :-*
Support bacteria, they are the only culture some people have!


If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I.
~ Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) ~ (Thankx to gimmejack)

Offline Jack Rance

  • Cassie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #2 on: Jan 22, 2006, 03:31 PM »
Very informative -I'm still upset the A Love that Will Never Grow Old has been eliminated from Best Song consideration but we'll just have to go with Best Score then ...

Offline hidesert

  • Alma
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
  • Gender: Male
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #3 on: Jan 22, 2006, 06:02 PM »
Very informative -I'm still upset the A Love that Will Never Grow Old has been eliminated from Best Song consideration but we'll just have to go with Best Score then ...

Yeah, me too.  Apparently AMPAS rules state it is supposed to have a prominent place in the film. I agree, I'll be satisfied if it is nominated and wins for "Best Score".

Offline ethan

  • Administrator
  • Jack + Ennis
  • ***
  • Posts: 11211
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #4 on: Jan 31, 2006, 12:38 AM »
http://wcbstv.com/entertainment/local_story_030134340.html

(CBS) HOLLYWOOD Below find some special stats about the Oscars, including some films with the highest number of nominations.

Most Nominations for a Film
14 NOMINATIONS
All about Eve, 20th Century-Fox, 1950 (6 awards)
Titanic, 20th Century Fox and Paramount, 1997 (11 awards)

13 NOMINATIONS
Gone with the Wind, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939 (8 awards, plus one Special and one Sci/Tech awards)
From Here to Eternity, Columbia, 1953 (8 awards)
Mary Poppins, Buena Vista Distribution Company, 1964 (5 awards)
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Warner Bros., 1966 (5 awards)
Forrest Gump, Paramount, 1994 (6 awards)
Shakespeare in Love, Miramax, 1998 (7 awards)
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, New Line, 2001 (4 awards)
Chicago, Miramax, 2002 (6 awards)

12 NOMINATIONS
Mrs. Miniver, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1942 (6 awards)
The Song of Bernadette, 20th Century-Fox, 1943 (4 awards)
Johnny Belinda, Warner Bros., 1948 (1 award)
A Streetcar Named Desire, Warner Bros., 1951 (4 awards)
On the Waterfront, Columbia, 1954 (8 awards)
Ben-Hur, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1959 (11 awards)
Becket, Paramount, 1964 (1 award)
My Fair Lady, Warner Bros., 1964 (8 awards)
Reds, Paramount, 1981 (3 awards)
Dances With Wolves, Orion, 1990 (7 awards)
Schindler's List, Universal, 1993 (7 awards)
The English Patient, Miramax, 1996 (9 awards)
Gladiator, DreamWorks and Universal, 2000 (5 awards)

11 NOMINATIONS
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Columbia, 1939 (1 award)
Rebecca, United Artists, 1940 (2 awards)
Sergeant York, Warner Bros., 1941 (2 awards)
Pride of the Yankees, RKO Radio, 1942 (1 award)
Sunset Boulevard, Paramount, 1950 (3 awards)
Judgment at Nuremberg, United Artists, 1961 (2 awards)
West Side Story, United Artists, 1961 (10 awards)
Oliver!, Columbia, 1968 (5 awards, plus 1 Honorary award)
Chinatown, Paramount, 1974 (1 award)
The Godfather Part II, Paramount, 1974 (6 awards)
Julia, 20th Century-Fox, 1977 (3 awards)
The Turning Point, 20th Century-Fox, 1977 (0 awards)
Gandhi, Columbia, 1982 (8 awards)
Terms of Endearment, Paramount, 1983 (5 awards)
Amadeus, Orion, 1984 (8 awards)
A Passage to India, Columbia, 1984 (2 awards)
The Color Purple, Warner Bros., 1985 (0 awards)
Out of Africa, Universal, 1985 (7 awards)
Saving Private Ryan, DreamWorks/Paramount, 1998 (5 awards)
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, New Line, 2003 (11 awards)
The Aviator, Miramax, Initial Entertainment Group and Warner Bros., 2004 (5 awards)

10 NOMINATIONS
The Life of Emile Zola, Warner Bros., 1937 (3 awards)
How Green Was My Valley, 20th Century-Fox, 1941 (5 awards)
Going My Way, Paramount, 1944 (7 awards)
Wilson, 20th Century-Fox, 1944 (5 awards)
Roman Holiday, Paramount, 1953 (3 awards)
Giant, Warner Bros., 1956 (1 award)
Sayonara, Warner Bros., 1957 (4 awards)
The Apartment, United Artists, 1960 (5 awards)
Lawrence of Arabia, Columbia, 1962 (7 awards)
Tom Jones, United Artists, 1963 (4 awards)
Doctor Zhivago, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1965 (5 awards)
The Sound of Music, 20th Century-Fox, 1965 (5 awards)
Bonnie and Clyde, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, 1967 (2 awards)
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Columbia, 1967 (2 awards)
Anne of the Thousand Days, Universal, 1969 (1 award)
Airport, Universal, 1970 (1 award)
Patton, 20th Century-Fox, 1970 (7 awards)
Cabaret, Allied Artists, 1972 (8 awards)
The Godfather, Paramount, 1972 (3 awards)
The Exorcist, Warner Bros., 1973 (2 awards)
The Sting, Universal, 1973 (7 awards)
Network, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, 1976 (4 awards)
Rocky, United Artists, 1976 (3 awards)
Star Wars, 20th Century-Fox, 1977 (6 awards, plus 1 Special Achievement award)
On Golden Pond, Universal, 1981 (3 awards)
Tootsie, Columbia, 1982 (1 award)
Bugsy, TriStar, 1991 (2 awards)
Braveheart, Paramount, 1995 (5 awards)
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Sony Pictures Classics, 2000 (4 awards)
Gangs of New York, Miramax, 2002 (0 awards)
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, 20th Century Fox, 2003 (2 awards)

FILMS RECEIVING AWARDS FOR BEST PICTURE, DIRECTING, ACTOR, ACTRESS AND WRITING
1934 (7th) It Happened One Night
1975 (48th) One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
1991 (64th) The Silence of the Lambs

PERSONS RECEIVING 2 OR MORE ACTING AWARDS
  • indicates number of acting nominations received

* Every nomination resulted in the award

4 Awards
Katharine Hepburn -- Actress (1932/33) (1967) (1968) (1981) [12]

3 Awards
Ingrid Bergman -- Actress (1944) (1956); Supporting Actress (1974) [7]
Walter Brennan -- Supporting Actor (1936) (1938) (1940) [4]
Jack Nicholson -- Actor (1975) (1997); Supporting Actor (1983) [12]

2 Awards
Marlon Brando -- Actor (1954) (1972) [8]
Michael Caine -- Supporting Actor (1986) (1999) [6]
Gary Cooper -- Actor (1941) (1952) (also Honorary Award - 1960) [5]
Bette Davis -- Actress (1935) (1938) [10]
Olivia de Havilland -- Actress (1946) (1949) [5]
Robert De Niro -- Supporting Actor (1974); Actor (1980) [6]
Melvyn Douglas -- Supporting Actor (1963) (1979) [3]
Sally Field -- Actress (1979) (1984) [2]*
Jane Fonda -- Actress (1971) (1978) [7]
Jodie Foster -- Actress (1988) (1991) [4]
Gene Hackman -- Actor (1971); Supporting Actor (1992) [5]
Tom Hanks -- Actor (1993) (1994) [5]
Helen Hayes -- Actress (1931/32); Supporting Actress (1970) [2]*
Dustin Hoffman -- Actor (1979) (1988) [7]
Glenda Jackson -- Actress (1970) (1973) [4]
Jessica Lange -- Supporting Actress (1982); Actress (1994) [6]
Vivien Leigh -- Actress (1939) (1951) [2]*
Jack Lemmon -- Supporting Actor (1955); Actor (1973) [8]
Fredric March -- Actor (1931/32) (1946) [5]
Anthony Quinn -- Supporting Actor (1952) (1956) [4]
Luise Rainer -- Actress (1936) (1937) [2]*
Jason Robards -- Supporting Actor (1976) (1977) [3]
Maggie Smith -- Actress (1969); Supporting Actress (1978) [6]
Kevin Spacey -- Supporting Actor (1995); Actor (1999) [2]*
Meryl Streep -- Supporting Actress (1979); Actress (1982) [13]
Hilary Swank -- Actress (1999) (2004) [2]*
Elizabeth Taylor -- Actress (1960) (1966) [5]
Spencer Tracy -- Actor (1937) (1938) [9]
Peter Ustinov -- Supporting Actor (1960) (1964) [3] (plus 1 writing nomination)
Denzel Washington -- Supporting Actor (1989); Actor (2001) [5]
Dianne Wiest -- Supporting Actress (1986) (1994) [3]
Shelley Winters -- Supporting Actress (1959) (1965) [4]

ACTOR (in a Leading Role)
(* indicates a win)
Oldest Winners [from date of birth to date of awards ceremony]

76 years, 317 days -- *Henry Fonda, On Golden Pond (1981)
[May 16, 1905 -- March 29, 1982]

62 years, 316 days -- *John Wayne, True Grit (1969)
[May 26, 1907 -- April 7, 1970]

62 years, 209 days -- *George Arliss, Disraeli (1929/30)
[April 10, 1868 -- November 5, 1930]

62 years, 63 days -- *Paul Newman, The Color of Money (1986)
[January 26, 1925 -- March 30, 1987]

60 years, 335 days -- *Jack Nicholson, As Good As It Gets (1997)
[April 22, 1937 -- March 23, 1998]

60 years, 181 days -- *Peter Finch, Network (1976)
[September 28, 1916 -- March 28, 1977]

57 years, 39 days -- *Ronald Colman, A Double Life (1947)
[February 9, 1891 -- March 20, 1948]

57 years, 31 days -- *Rex Harrison, My Fair Lady (1964)
[March 5, 1908 -- April 5, 1965]

56 years, 155 days -- *Art Carney, Harry and Tonto (1974)
[November 4, 1918 -- April 8, 1975]

54 years, 91 days -- *Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
[December 31, 1937 -- March 30, 1992]

Youngest Winners [from date of birth to date of awards ceremony]
29 years, 343 days -- *Adrien Brody, The Pianist (2002)
[April 14, 1973 -- March 23, 2003]

30 years, 156 days -- *Richard Dreyfuss, The Goodbye Girl (1977)
[October 29, 1947 -- April 3, 1978]

30 years, 361 days -- *Marlon Brando, On the Waterfront (1954)
[April 3, 1924 -- March 30, 1955]

31 years, 122 days -- *Maximilian Schell, Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)
[December 8, 1930 -- April 9, 1962]

32 years, 78 days -- *Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas (1995)
[January 7, 1964 -- March 25, 1996]

32 years, 283 days -- *James Stewart, The Philadelphia Story (1940)
[May 20, 1908 -- February 27, 1941]

32 years, 331 days -- *Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot (1989)
[April 29, 1957 -- March 26, 1990]

34 years, 26 days -- *Clark Gable, It Happened One Night (1934)
[February 1, 1901 -- February 27, 1935]

34 years, 258 days -- *Charles Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII (1932/33)
[July 1, 1899 -- March 16, 1934]

34 years, 348 days -- *Robert Donat, Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)
[March 18, 1905 -- February 29, 1940]

ACTRESS (in a Leading Role)
(* indicates a win)

Oldest Winners [from date of birth to date of awards ceremony]
80 years, 293 days -- *Jessica Tandy, Driving Miss Daisy (1989)
[June 7, 1909 -- March 26, 1990]

74 years, 321 days -- *Katharine Hepburn, On Golden Pond (1981)
[May 12, 1907 -- March 29, 1982]

63 years, 1 day -- *Marie Dressler, Min and Bill (1930/31)
[November 9, 1868 -- November 10, 1931]

61 years, 337 days -- *Katharine Hepburn, The Lion in Winter (1968)
[May 12, 1907 -- April 14, 1969]

61 years, 122 days -- *Geraldine Page, The Trip to Bountiful (1985)
[November 22, 1924 -- March 24, 1986]

60 years, 334 days -- *Katharine Hepburn, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967)
[May 12, 1907 -- April 10, 1968]

49 years, 351 days -- *Shirley MacLaine, Terms of Endearment (1983)
[April 24, 1934 -- April 9, 1984]

49 years, 173 days -- *Susan Sarandon, Dead Man Walking (1995)
[October 4, 1946 -- March 25, 1996]

48 years, 14 days -- *Anna Magnani, The Rose Tattoo (1955)
[March 7, 1908 -- March 21, 1956]

45 years, 341 days -- *Jessica Lange, Blue Sky (1994)
[April 20, 1949 -- March 27, 1995]

Youngest Winners [from date of birth to date of awards ceremony]
21 years, 218 days -- *Marlee Matlin, Children of a Lesser God (1986)
[August 24, 1965 -- March 30, 1987]

22 years, 222 days -- *Janet Gaynor, 7th Heaven, Street Angel, and Sunrise (1927/28)
[October 6, 1906 -- May 16, 1929]

24 years, 127 days -- *Joan Fontaine, Suspicion (1941)
[October 22, 1917 -- February 26, 1942]

24 years, 325 days -- *Audrey Hepburn, Roman Holiday (1953)
[May 4, 1929 -- March 25, 1954]

25 years exactly -- *Jennifer Jones, The Song of Bernadette (1943)
[March 2, 1919 -- March 2, 1944]

25 years, 4 days -- *Julie Christie, Darling (1965)
[April 14, 1941 -- April 18, 1966]

25 years, 240 days -- *Hilary Swank, Boys Don't Cry (1999)
[July 30, 1974 -- March 26, 2000]

26 years, 116 days -- *Vivien Leigh, Gone with the Wind (1939)
[November 5, 1913 -- February 29, 1940]

26 years, 130 days -- *Jodie Foster, The Accused (1988)
[November 19, 1962 -- March 29, 1989]

26 years, 138 days -- *Grace Kelly, The Country Girl (1954)
[November 12, 1928 -- March 30, 1955]

BEST ACTOR / BEST ACTRESS WINNERS FROM THE SAME FILM
1934 (7th) Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert -- It Happened One Night
1975 (48th) Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher -- One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
1976 (49th) Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway -- Network
1978 (51st) Jon Voight, Jane Fonda -- Coming Home
1981 (54th) Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn -- On Golden Pond
1991 (64th) Anthony Hopkins, Jodie Foster -- The Silence of the Lambs
1997 (70th) Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt -- As Good As It Gets

DIRECTORS WITH 2 OR MORE DIRECTING AWARDS
(
  • indicates number of nominations)


2 AWARDS
Lewis Milestone [3]
1927/28 (1st) - Two Arabian Knights (Directing - Comedy Picture)
1929/30 (3rd) - All Quiet on the Western Front

Frank Borzage [2]
1927/28 (1st) - 7th Heaven (Directing - Dramatic Picture)
1931/32 (5th) - Bad Girl

Frank Lloyd [3]
1928/29 (2nd) - The Divine Lady
1932/33 (6th) - Cavalcade

Leo McCarey [3]
1937 (10th) - The Awful Truth
1944 (17th) - Going My Way

Joseph L. Mankiewicz [4]
1949 (22nd) - A Letter to Three Wives
1950 (23rd) - All about Eve

Elia Kazan [5]
1947 (20th) - Gentleman's Agreement
1954 (27th) - On the Waterfront

George Stevens [5]
1951 (24th) - A Place in the Sun
1956 (29th) - Giant

Billy Wilder [8]
1945 (18th) - The Lost Weekend
1960 (33rd) - The Apartment

David Lean [7]
1957 (30th) - The Bridge on the River Kwai
1962 (35th) - Lawrence of Arabia

Robert Wise [3]
1961 (34th) - West Side Story (co-directed with Jerome Robbins)
1965 (38th) - The Sound of Music

Fred Zinnemann [7]
1953 (26th) - From Here to Eternity
1966 (39th) - A Man for All Seasons

Milos Forman [3]
1975 (48th) - One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
1984 (57th) - Amadeus

Oliver Stone [3]
1986 (59th) - Platoon
1989 (62nd) - Born on the Fourth of July

Steven Spielberg [5]
1993 (66th) - Schindler's List
1998 (71st) - Saving Private Ryan

Clint Eastwood [3]
1992 (65th) - Unforgiven
2004 (77th) - Million Dollar Baby
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed

JerBear418720

  • Guest
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #5 on: Jan 31, 2006, 10:35 AM »
Wow, thanks for a fascinating post, Ethan!  I hope you were able to copy and paste all that.  If not, your fingers must be bleeding!  :)

Offline ethan

  • Administrator
  • Jack + Ennis
  • ***
  • Posts: 11211
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
Re: Oscar Nomination Basics
« Reply #6 on: Jan 31, 2006, 01:27 PM »
Wow, thanks for a fascinating post, Ethan!  I hope you were able to copy and paste all that.  If not, your fingers must be bleeding!  :)

You are welcome. I did copy and paste.  :)
Remembering Pierre (chameau) 1960-2015, a "Capricorn bro and crazy Frog Uncle from the North Pole." You are missed