Author Topic: BFI Sight & Sound  (Read 2042 times)

Offline daveya26

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BFI Sight & Sound
« on: Jan 24, 2006, 07:49 AM »
Hi

Not sure if someone already posted this but I just found a link to an excellent article from the British Film Institutes' publication 'Sight and Sound'

http://www.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound/feature/49251

Offline daveya26

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Re: BFI Sight & Sound
« Reply #1 on: Jan 24, 2006, 07:52 AM »
Sight and Sound also voted BBM, film of the year :)

http://www.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound/feature/49257

Offline tpe

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Re: BFI Sight & Sound
« Reply #2 on: Jan 24, 2006, 11:28 AM »
Hi

Not sure if someone already posted this but I just found a link to an excellent article from the British Film Institutes' publication 'Sight and Sound'

http://www.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound/feature/49251

Very beautiful writing.  I have to exerpt the following:
 
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Lee photographs the scenes where Jack and Ennis first work together in mountain peaks that are accessible only by mule with considerable attention, relating the landscape to the men in a much more subtle way than John Ford achieved with all those phallic buttes in Monument Valley. He says he had the spare guitar chords of the score in his head even when he was scouting for locations. As he fleshes out the men's relationship - one tending the camp and the other high on the peak guarding the sheep from coyotes - he suggests that Jack may be the proactive partner and Ennis the homely sensible one, confounding the eventual configuration of the only full sex scene, after whisky has been consumed and the night is sufficiently cold. To use the later, unexpectedly beautiful phrase of their contemptuous employer, this is the moment when they "stem the rose".

That the men are tending sheep is perhaps already a signal that we are stepping away from the traditional cowhand ­aesthetic: this could be Palestine in Biblical times or Greece when the gods walked the earth (Ganymede, after all, was a shepherd) if it weren't that the hills, forests and skies of Wyoming are so particular. There's even a muted hint of the early scene of sheep running off a cliff in John Schlesinger's 1967 Far from the Madding Crowd (jumping off cliffs naked together on their fishing trips is one of the men's especial pleasures). Shepherds are perhaps more intimately involved with their animals than other farm workers and here the ministrations to the diminutive sheep and lambs are shown as almost maternal.

Universality and timelessness make Brokeback Mountain feel as if its story could have happened anywhere around the world in any era since the bronze age (confirming Lee's contention that it is not in fact a Western). It takes place over 40 years beginning in 1963, a few months before the assassination of John F. Kennedy, but nothing about America registers in the narrative. Vietnam? No mention. The Summer of Love? Nothing there. There's no Scorsese-like time-setting music, and Nixon, Wall Street, Robert Mapplethorpe or Bill Gates might as well not exist. The only sense of time passing is in the upgrades of the pick-up trucks, occasional period interiors or a new windcheater or jacket. Mechanisation is routinely shown as alien and alienating and the two main characters' fishing trips seem to be as much about getting away from the world as about evading their wives. Only when Ennis brings his two daughters to their trysting place does the idyll collapse once and for all.

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