Author Topic: News Coverage:December 2006  (Read 9611 times)

Offline Jennis

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News Coverage:December 2006
« on: Dec 02, 2006, 11:22 PM »
Aww,look what is top of the list <^(

Jennis.x


The Sunday Times

December 3rd 2006

50 best DVDs of 2006  
 
Big film releases 
 
Brokeback Mountain EIV, 15, £19.99
Ang Lee’s gay Brief Encounter, starring Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal and Wyoming, is sparely and precisely directed.

Click here!



Offline Jennis

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #1 on: Dec 02, 2006, 11:22 PM »
I suspect they mean sparsly?

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #2 on: Dec 03, 2006, 11:45 PM »
Thanks Jennis  :^^)

That's great news.

Offline Asali

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #3 on: Dec 10, 2006, 02:39 PM »
Found the following in todays paper, I don't believe it at all.

IS Heath Ledger under the thumb? According to reports from the US, the Australian actor is being reined in from his partying ways by fiancee Michelle Williams. Ledger has apparently been banned from hitting the town with a certain group of Aussie and British mates in LA, while she stays home and looks after their daughter Matilda.

"People's minds are like parachutes. To function properly they must first be open." - W.G.P.

It use to feel like a mass of dots. But more and more these days, I feel like we're all connected. (Latter Days)

Offline Jennis

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #4 on: Dec 13, 2006, 11:04 PM »
Thursday, December 14th 2006    
 
Jake's Brokeback Mountain hat on ebay

The brown cowboy hat worn by Jake Gyllenhaal in the Academy Award nominated film 'Brokeback Mountain' is now for sale on ebay.

The hat comes with a certificate of authenticity. At time of writing, the bidding for it on the auction website has reached US $10,100 (NZ$14,636).

Proceeds from the sale will go to Variety Children's Charity, who assist addicted, abused, neglected and physically-challenged children in Southern California.

The charity has previously benefited from similarly auctioned items including shirts from Brokeback Mountain, tickets to the final of Amercian Idol, and the car from the movie 'Herbie Fully Loaded'.

The auction will close on Monday.

Click here!

N.B.The pictures of the hat and news/piccies of Ennis' jacket also in an auction are in BBM Wardrobe thread :)


      




Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #5 on: Dec 14, 2006, 06:34 PM »
If I recall, the black hat was one of the last items sold at the wardrobe auction and that it sold for 3000.00 USD.  The appreciation exhibited here is quite phenomenal!  I would love to get the hat and the Ennis jacket, but I am not sure if I should commit to above 10 000.00 USD. Then again, I had thought that 300.00 USD was phenomenal then!  It sounds like a bargain now...

The auction ends on Jake's birthday on the 19th, no?  :)


Offline Jennis

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #6 on: Dec 14, 2006, 06:36 PM »

The auction ends on Jake's birthday on the 19th, no?  :)

How apt :)
J.x

Offline Jennis

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #7 on: Dec 14, 2006, 06:49 PM »
Interview With Brokeback Mountain Producer James Schamus
by Michael Jensen, December 14, 2006



One year ago this month, Brokeback Mountain opened in New York City before gradually opening across the country. After breaking box office records in New York, Brokeback went on to gross $83 million domestically (more than double that worldwide) and won more Best Picture and Director awards in America than any other film in history. Indeed, Brokeback Mountain is arguably the most honored film of all time. To celebrate the anniversary of Brokeback Mountain's release, we recently spoke with Brokeback's executive producer and the CEO of Focus Features, James Schamus.

AfterElton.com: What can you tell me about the director's cut of Brokeback Mountain?
James Schamus: It's not even really a director's cut. … The changes really are very minuscule. They're going to package in some … featurettes about the music, the reception of the film. What you saw [in the theaters] was the director's cut. It's what Ang wanted.

AE: That's good to hear.
JS: Yeah. They wanted to put in some deleted scenes. There was a discussion about deleted scenes, but quite frankly, as Ang said, “The reason I deleted them was because I wanted to delete them. So why would I put them in the DVD?” [Laughs.] That's a pretty good point there, Ang!

AE: There was probably a certain faction of the audience hoping for an alternative ending.
JS: Well, yes. You know my joke is that in the sequel, Heath will go to New York and become one of the Village People. [ Laughs.] That's a whole other different movie.

AE: It's just so sad that so many straight men wouldn't see the movie. I hadn't thought about this when I saw Brokeback, but what would director John Ford have said about Brokeback Mountain?
JS: Ang did not want to put the film in the western category. He knew the film was about the West, and he knew if he overstudied westerns while he was preparing it, he would be stultified a bit and getting into a genre he wasn't interested in, because [Brokeback Mountain] is not a “western” per se. But it is about people of the West and men of the West.
So he is very aware of westerns, and we watched a lot together. And what he wanted was a movie that was, I think, stylistically a little different. You know, there are a lot of main wide shots, and [in] Brokeback he doesn't punch in a lot. When he does, it's usually very specific, and it's a very simple course of filmmaking.

AE: It also seems very much a movie about class.
JS: Thank you! No one talked about that. A few people did. But in terms of general culture, I think because of the gay love story there was really very little discourse saying “ Jeez, you actually don't see a lot of movies about working-class people, historically.”

AE: Absolutely.
JS: It's almost like a law saying you're not allowed to do it. So thank you for saying that, because we always knew why it wasn't being discussed. … There is a whole other part of this [film] that gets teased out that has to do with the relation of class.

AE: Well, even through the prism of gay issues, it seems like Jake, since he has more money, is able to think outside the box about having a different kind of life, whereas —
JS: This is exactly right.

AE: Heath is in such a small world that he can't really see outside it. Unless you have a certain amount of economic freedom, you can't really think of those things. If you're willing to comment at this point, do you have a sense of how Brokeback is going to fit in cinematic history?
JS: I honestly — I make 'em, you tell me …
 
AE: As an artist, how hard is it for you to make your movies and then divorce yourself from the public reaction? Brokeback is especially pertinent to me in that sense because gay men felt such a sense of ownership and had such a strong reaction to so many aspects of the film. So I wonder if you're able to say, “Oh, that is interesting,” but not actually let negative things seep in.
JS: Well, it can't help but. I think it depends on how and under [what] circumstances. I'll never forget by the time the DVD came out where the ads … were 15-second spots. This is long after the Oscars and all the hoopla. Everybody knew what the movie was, but they were doing these spots which were really Jake and Anne Hathaway, Heath and Michelle Williams, and all this kind of romantic [thing]. People would say, “Wow, what are you trying to do at this late date? Fool people into thinking [it's not gay]?” I was like, “Are you kidding? Are you out of your minds?” I didn't cut those ads, but I understand the appeal was this statement [to straight women]: “We're in love with beautiful gay men. Oh, my God.”

AE: Interestingly, I remember coming across the small but vocal gay segment that sometimes would say, “I'm not that interested in Brokeback Mountain. It doesn't seem gay enough.” These were people who wouldn't see it for different reasons than certain straight men wouldn't see it. Did you come across any of that?
JS: I did a little bit. I honestly believe this as a filmmaker: There is no such thing as a 100 percent politically correct work of art. No matter what it is. If you're dealing with issues of any kind — if you're trying to get your imagination to the next level — you're going to be messing in politically incorrect ways with politically incorrect things.
So when you hear an attack like that, you can be dismissive and say, “Well, they're just writing us off and they're so wrong and we're so good, and I'm so politically correct and you don't understand.” But that's not actually an appropriate response. What you want to say is “OK, they see something in there that is actually rubbing against stuff that won't show how good I am. And I want to see where the friction is, because that is an interesting place to be psychologically and artistically and politically.”
Let's put it this way: Ten years ago if we had made Brokeback, especially the intellectual elite in the gay community would have hated it. They would have [hated it] because the narrative closure is tragic. We kill the gay person for being gay, and therefore we “ spake ” in a closing- off of political possibilities for that subject. Because when we were making the movie, I was very aware of the fact that this is a tragic test, and therefore has a punitive closure on at least one of its characters, if not both of them. Although there is that hint … at the end, [where] I feel there is an emotional opening that says, “Wow, this gave me access to love because I now accept that is my relationship, that this is who I am.” Even if it is literally in a closet.

AE: I wanted to ask you about The Wedding Banquet.
JS: You know, we were very proud of Wedding Banquet. I can tell you on Ang's behalf that was the scariest moment of our professional lives, ever. You have to understand when we made The Wedding Banquet, queer cinema was the way you represented gay culture. There was no Will & Grace and any of that stuff. It didn't exist. So we made this movie which was a screwball comedy. Again, we did the same move in that we took a classic Hollywood genre, and we queered it. We made the film and we had a screening for GLAAD, and Ang was convinced that 550 angry gay people would band together and kill him before the screening.

AE: Why?
JS: Because it was light. It was mainstream. It was not angst-filled, and he's not gay. How could he do something with gay characters at the center of the story? All these things. He was very nervous. At the end of that screening, when 550 hundred people literally stood on their chairs and applauded for 10 minutes, he [Ang] was weeping. He was crying.

AE: It seems like a movie like Brokeback truly is a cultural milestone that reflects a change in society, but since the movie spoke so clearly to gay men and women, is there a way to reach straight men through art like this?
JS: One of the ways is to ignore them as we did in everything we did. We ignored any objection. We simply didn't hear it. When all the homophobes came out in the first few weeks of the release, all the blah, blah, blah on the talk shows, you'll notice something. Or maybe you didn't. We never showed up. We never debated.

AE: I did notice. You guys stayed away.
JS: Right. We never gave them the berth to frame a conversation with us, ever. You didn't see me on O'Reilly. You never saw any spokespeople for this movie when there was a homophobe around. Their strategy, of course, was that this film would tank anyway, so, “Ha ha ha. Have you seen it? No. Ha ha ha. I wouldn't!”
Well, guess what? A month later we knew we would drive a huge gross from our core audience. We knew women would come out, and as the grosses got bigger, suddenly they were in a bit of a quandary. “What do I do? Should I see it? Should I not? I don't have anything to say.”
Suddenly there was that kind of tipping moment where it was not cool to tell a homophobic Brokeback joke. Suddenly you had to tell nice jokes or do nice parodies or celebrate [the movie] because there was no one to argue with. I really think there is a very powerful aspect to the things you don't notice. You don't notice when the guy at the water cooler pauses and thinks, “I better not tell this joke because I realize that a lot of people have seen this movie and seem to like it, and maybe it's not safe for me to push it here.”

AE: During the voting period for the Oscars when certain people like Tony Curtis and Ernest Borgnine started speaking up and saying things that were hurting the movie, was there any temptation to —
JS: That all happened at the end of the voting. A lot of it was the response to [how] in the trade ads we became more and more explicit about portraying the [gay] relationship. We actually ran some front-page trade ads — literally the cover page of Variety — of the two boys, one naked holding the other, and really selling it that way. I've been told by about 500 people that is why we didn't win the award. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. I don't care. So it's an award. Whatever. But it's very interesting to see that the Borgnines and the Tony Curtises — to be honest, Some Like It Hot is pretty much our family's all-time favorite movie. To have Tony Curtis just … [Sighs.]

AE: Unbelievable.
JS: At that point in time, if it had been earlier, I think I would have dealt with it head-on. But since the voting was closing and everything, we were on a roll. The box office, everything was happening. You guys probably noticed, but nobody else noticed there was no mainstream press pick-up on those comments.

AE: None. Nobody defended it or anything.
JS: It was left to the side. If it had [hit] the L.A. Times or the New York Times, I probably would have gone after them.

AE: It hit Entertainment Weekly.
JS: Yeah, but that was already [too late]. So at that point why … you start looking like sour grapes. “We didn't get the award because …” You know, I believe in a certain kind of graciousness. Frankly, the Crash folks did a great campaign. They knew what they were doing, and they did a great job. The never went negative.

AE: Even though Crash had won nothing, and you had won everything.
JS: But that was the problem. If I could have asked, “Please hold back a little bit,” I would have. I've always been the underdog. I knew we had lost Best Picture. As soon as the voting closed, I knew.

AE: Why?
JS: Because I get feedback from the community and the publicists. I can smell it. I told everybody at the company, “We're not going to win Best Picture. You did a great job. We did everything we possibly could. There is only so far you can go.” But every year before we came in, we came in as the underdog. Every year when we haven't won, it's been OK, and then when we have won, it's been amazing. So this year [we] were going to lose. But there is a difference. When The Pianist doesn't win it's like, “Oh, yeah. Right. Like we were gonna win.”
But when Brokeback lost I said, “You're going to feel it. You're going to feel like you lost, because we did. And it'll hit you, and it'll be tough.” But you know what? This is a business and we did our best, and because, to a certain extent, we were the frontrunner, we were the one to take down. The Lionsgate guys were very smart. They isolated us and made themselves the underdog and made that work for them. What do you do? That's what I would have done.

AE: Before, you told me that you lost for essentially the reasons you made the film for in the first place.
JS: I think that is fair to say. I don't want to cast aspersions on their win as if their win was because of the politics of the film, although clearly, as you know, these older guys, these very, very old, male Academy members became, at the very end, very vocal. If we lost by one vote, we know why we lost. But we don't know how many votes we lost by, so you can't really sit around and speculate. It was a fact, no question, but you know what? Maybe next time around it won't be. So that is good.

AE: Do you think Brokeback has made it easier for gay movies to get made? Or for straight actors like Jake and Heath to take these roles?
JS: Clearly, there is no question straight actors can take on these roles any time they want now. As I said to Andy Towle, the big test is when a big hunky movie star … comes out. I think we moved the dial on that. The big test … is when the great male movie star — female too — comes out of the closet and then gets the job kissing Julia Roberts. That's the test. There's not even a test prep class for that. I think that is the next step forward.

AE: I think Neil Patrick Harris put us a little bit closer. I think that is an important step.
JS: Yes. I think so, too. I think it's great.

AE: You've certainly enabled it in all your work. Not just Brokeback Mountain.
JS: It's been an incredible journey. Really, a big part of watching the process take shape outside of our little corner has just been wonderful.

Jay Gilman contributed to this interview.

Click here!

Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #8 on: Dec 14, 2006, 08:30 PM »

The auction ends on Jake's birthday on the 19th, no?  :)

How apt :)
J.x

A great birthday offering.  Yes, so very apt.


Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #9 on: Dec 18, 2006, 01:02 PM »


From: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1570839,00.html

--------------------------------------------------------------


The Year in Buzzwords 2006

By CAROLYN SAYRE
Posted Sunday, Dec. 17, 2006

What's the word on the street? With the help of Paul McFedries of Word Spy.com and Aaron Peckham of Urban Dictionary, we drew up a list of neologisms that got people talking in 2006.

BROKEBACK MARRIAGE n. Thanks to Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal and their celebrated screen tragedy, there's now a term to describe a union between a gay man and a straight woman or a gay married man having an affair.

CELEBUTARD n. A celebrity widely perceived as unintelligent. We're not naming any names, Paris Hilton.

CIVIL WAR n. Not a new term, but Iraq's deteriorating "sectarian violence"--to use President George W. Bush's preferred phrase--had people asking, Is it or isn't it?

FED-EX n. So long, K-Fed. The tabloids found a new name for Kevin Federline after his breakup with Britney Spears.

LIQUID TERROR n. After terrorists plotted to board planes in London with liquid explosives, this term was coined for the latest suspected terrorist tactic.

MACACA n. A racial slur? A kind of monkey? Virginia Senator George Allen, who used it at a campaign rally when he spotted an Indian-American volunteer from his opponent's camp, might define it as "the end of my re-election campaign."

MCSTEAMY n. He's no McDreamy, but Grey's Anatomy's newest character, Dr. Mark Sloan, usually known by his nickname, had fans buzzing.

SEASON CREEP n. Spring seemed to come early this year--and summer lasted a bit longer. What's to blame? Most scientists say global warming.

THE DECIDER n. A self-coined sobriquet for Bush, who bestowed the label on himself when explaining his initial rejection of calls for Donald Rumsfeld to step down as Secretary of Defense.

WIKIALITY n. Wikipedia + reality = truth based on consensus rather than fact. The growing popularity of the online encyclopedia, for which the public writes and edits entries, gave rise to the term.


Offline NoReins

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #10 on: Dec 20, 2006, 03:20 AM »
In the Christmas edition of the Radio Times TV guide in the UK, there's an article written by Barry Norman who is probably the UK's most respected film critic. The article is about the American Film Institute's list of "America's most inspiring movies" and is talking about the choices in the list and those movies that were missed out....this bit caught my attention

"...Philadelphia might well have softened the public attitude towards AIDS, and Brokeback Mountain (also not in the list, though it should be) has elicited greater understanding of homosexuality, though in the latter case not enough to persuade voters to give it a deserved Oscar for best picture. Instead they took the softer option and chose the inferior Crash, whose message, more or less universally accepted nowadays, was that racism is really not very nice..."

Well said, Barry :clap:
He will be eternally missed, but he will never be forgotten

Christopher Nolan, accepting the Best Supporting Actor Golden Globe on Heath's behalf.

He was, as an actor and a professional and a human being, one of a kind

Charles Roven, accepting Heath's BAFTA.

This award tonight would have humbly validated Heath's quiet determination to be truly accepted by you all here — his peers within an industry he so loved.

Kim Ledger, accepting Heath's Oscar.

Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #11 on: Dec 20, 2006, 10:45 AM »
Thanks for sharing this, NoReins.

I guess the list compilers thought that BBM was too tragic to be deemed "inspiring" (taken in a very sugar-coated way, I guess).  In any case, woe unto them.  They are on the losing side.  They will be mocked for the omission.


Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #12 on: Dec 20, 2006, 10:48 AM »
I just checked out the AFI's list.  It is uneven, at best.  Decidedly lacking in overall taste.  There are a lot of gems, though these gems are set side by side with excrement.


Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #13 on: Dec 21, 2006, 07:17 PM »
Very nice, indeed.

From http://www.gaycitynews.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17620768&BRD=2729&PAG=461&dept_id=569328&rfi=6

----------------------------------------------------

Brokeback Moment
By: PAUL SCHINDLER
12/21/2006

A couple of hours after my dad arrived Saturday for a holiday visit of several weeks, I asked him if he wanted to watch "the gay cowboy movie." HBO has been playing the hell out of "Brokeback Mountain" all month, I suppose to mark the one-year anniversary of its theatrical release.
 
My father quickly said no, and then added he wanted to watch "Sunset Boulevard," airing on another cable channel, also without commercial interruption. I'll leave it to others to decide which of us suggested the gayer movie.

Before he arrived, I decided I was going to push my father a bit on this visit, though I hadn't been thinking specifically in terms of a gay cowboy movie-that idea just came into my head as we tooled around the channels after dinner. I was mostly hoping to prod him out of the sadness and inertia that's settled pretty firmly over him in the two years since my mom passed away. They were married for 58 years, and while they were always companions in the true sense of that word, especially in later years my dad grew content to rely, ever more exclusively, on my mother's attentions, leaving most of the outside socializing to her.

My father is 85 now and I think healing is hard for him at this age.


My parents were always about as broad-minded in terms of film interests, conversation, and other cultural adventuring as I could have hoped, so I never felt as though I needed to do a lot of heavy lifting on that score. In fact, as the palette of hit movies turned increasingly junky in recent decades, as least for my tastes, and too many of my friends followed the trends, I often joked that I called my parents first to get recommendations for what to see. By paying the couple-of-bucks senior fare for the Friday afternoon matinee, they usually could beat me to the latest release, and I found their reactions just about uniformly reliable.


Still, it was clear that my mother usually led the way, and I recognized quickly that a lot of my father's curiosities evaporated with her passing. My ideas on spurring enthusiasm on his trip this month weren't all that specific-they mostly centered on taking him to a Christmas party two good friends threw Sunday evening in the East Village.


For someone who has often proven to be a live wire in social situations-he has a Bronx native's gift of gab-he was pretty subdued at the party. Post-gathering, his debriefing of me consisted entirely of asking whether this one or that one were gay-and if there were any lesbians there. My answers provided the latest clues in his unraveling of the profound mystery of just how gay people find each other, and how straights find us as well.


Monday evening, as we once again flipped channels, he noticed "Brokeback" was about to air again and said he'd like to see it, that he had only been "kidding" when he said no on Saturday.


Whenever I watch a movie I've already seen with someone who hasn't yet, I endure a horribly uncomfortable sense of ownership about its ability to please. Never have I experienced this feeling as strongly as while watching "Brokeback" with my dad.


More disquieting than that, however, was my unease when-precisely 30 minutes into the film-Ennis finally joined Jack in the tent. I hadn't remembered how long that scene lasted. I certainly don't recall that Mr. Del Mar spitting into his hand was the clear signal that he was entering Mr. Twist.


As my skull echoed with the question, "What the hell is wrong with you?" I reminded myself that I'd always been uncomfortable viewing fairly explicit sexual renderings on film and TV with my parents. This really wasn't any different. But that excuse became more threadbare when my breath grew shallower even at the sight of a passionate kiss or, less intense still, Jake Gyllenhaal's bare chest being stroked by Heath Ledger.


As the film progressed, I occasionally stole a glance at my father, hoping to read his reaction, but he remained largely impassive. His only overt reaction was to say he was having trouble understanding the cowboy dialogue, much of it, especially Ledger's, practically swallowed. The actors in the old movie he'd watched while I was at work that day apparently enunciated a whole lot better.


And then all of a sudden I flashed on a memory that I hadn't thought of in a long time, but has been with me for decades nonetheless. At some point in my early youth-I can say with certainty this happened no later than 1966, and probably a few years earlier-our family was traveling, and as it happened I was staying in a motel room with my parents, and my two older brothers must have been in an adjoining room. I was supposed to be sleeping, but as was usual for me at that age I wasn't but merely pretending to be. A television drama was on-at my mother's urging, perhaps even insistence. On the screen, a man and woman were at home and the doorbell rang. When the man opened the door to another man, the two, out of sight of the woman, shared a kiss on the lips. Just at that moment, my father cursed and slammed the TV off, throwing the room into darkness.


This memory must sound apocryphal-and improbable to say the least. I can find no Internet reference to any on-air homosexual kiss dating to that period, and a call to the Museum of Television and Radio this week seeking research assistance was not returned.


But the memory has always been with me, from well before the time that I could possibly have conceived of the scene that unfolded, the thrill it induced, or its social meaning. (Perhaps the show was a British production with a one-shot airing on public television-that's the best I can offer as an explanation.) Until this week, I never mentioned this incident to another soul, and for years afterward I was stupefied by its import. My strongest sense memory of what was going on inside me is that I was giddy with relief to be in the dark the moment after it happened lest my feelings be visible. Yet-at the same time-I was let down in a palpably physical manner at not learning what would happen next.


When I was young and thought about that moment and the longing it unleashed, I believed absolutely that my life would never change. But it did. And so did my father's. Even without my mother's help, or urging, never mind insistence, he sat through his Brokeback moment. And so did I.


And nobody slammed the TV off.






Offline welshwitch

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #14 on: Dec 24, 2006, 03:28 PM »
Today Philip French, the influential film critic of the London "Observer", named his best films of the year. Top of the ten was our movie, which he said gave an entirely new way of looking at gay men and homosexual love, and brought about a change in society's attitudes to them.
« Last Edit: Dec 27, 2006, 01:11 PM by welshwitch »

Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #15 on: Dec 26, 2006, 11:11 AM »
Thank you, WW!


Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #16 on: Dec 26, 2006, 11:13 AM »
No direct mention of BBM, but we can attribute the inclusion of our actors to this, I'm sure.

From: http://seattle.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?newsid=101270&type_news=latest

---------------------------------------------------

IMDb.com’s Top Movie Stars of 2006
 
SEATTLE -- Johnny Depp Swashbuckles to the Top of the IMDb.com’s STARmeter for Third Consecutive Year; Angelina Jolie, Jessica Alba, Brad Pitt, and Scarlett Johansson Round Out the Top Five
IMDb.com (www.imdb.com), the site for movies, TV, celebrities and more, today unveiled the top 25 stars of 2006 as determined by the site’s STARmeter, which ranks celebrities’ popularity among IMDb.com’s more than 42 million unique monthly visitors. Johnny Depp, the 2004 and 2005 winner, once again generated the most fan interest this year, followed by headline-making couple Angelina Jolie (No. 2) and Brad Pitt (No. 4), as well as Hollywood beauties Jessica Alba (No. 3) and Scarlett Johansson (No. 5).

Dropping slightly in the rankings this year were gossip column regulars Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton, sliding to the No. 7 and No. 9 spots respectively. Other notable drops in rank include Keanu Reeves, Eva Longoria, Robert De Niro, Vin Diesel, Jon Heder of Napoleon Dynamite fame, and Nicole Kidman, who all lost their spots in the IMDb.com STARmeter Top 25 this year.

Newcomers to the top 25 in 2006 include Jake Gyllenhaal (No. 17), Zac Efron from High School Musical (No. 19), Heath Ledger (No. 21), Bruce Willis (No. 23) and Reese Witherspoon (No. 24). After reaching the ninth spot in 2004, Kate Beckinsale dropped off the list last year before making her return to the list (No. 14) on the strength of Underworld: Evolution and Click. The full list of the year’s top 25 celebrities can be seen in IMDb.com’s ”Road to the Oscars” section or at www.imdb.com/starmeter.

“IMDb.com's STARmeter is uniquely able to assess the actual popularity of celebrities by basing the list on the use patterns of visitors on the site,” said Keith Simanton, managing editor, IMDb.com. “For example, there appears to be a perennial, if probably clandestine, fascination with Hilary Duff; her only film of the year was the little-seen Material Girls but she still finds herself at No. 15. You can also see the ardent fan base for actors that people might not think of as big stars. This is Christian Bale’s second year on the list at No. 13. Last year it could be explained with his breakout role in Batman Returns. This year, though he was in a modest hit, The Prestige, his co-star in the film, Hugh Jackman, topped out at No. 40, even though he was also in the blockbuster X-Men 3: The Last Stand.”

There were several notable personalities who just missed the top 25 list, including Anne Hathaway (No. 26), despite her star role in the wildly successful movie The Devil Wears Prada.

Available through IMDb.com’s subscription service, IMDbPro.com (www.imbdpro.com), the STARmeter ranks celebrities’ weekly popularity based on the actual search behavior of the more than 42 million industry professionals and film enthusiasts who use IMDb.com each month. The STARmeter does not reflect box-office performance or critical assessments. The list of the year’s top 25 celebrities is an aggregate of 2006’s weekly STARmeter rankings.

Today, IMDb also released its ”best” and “worst” of 2006 polls featuring numerous categories including best actor, best actress and best film to name a few. These lists can be found at www.imdb.com/best2006 or www.imdb.com/worst2006.

About IMDbPro.com
Launched in January 2002, IMDbPro.com is an online subscription service designed to meet the information needs of entertainment and industry professionals and help them make better business and creative decisions. The service was created in response to the overwhelming demand of industry professionals, including directors and casting directors. IMDbPro.com features contact information for over 59,000 names and more than 10,000 companies; international, domestic and daily box-office numbers; news from the “Hollywood Reporter,” and much more. With subscriptions ranging from $12.95 a month to $99.95 for a full year, IMDbPro.com is one of the lowest-priced entertainment industry resources available. For more detailed information, visit www.imdbpro.com.

About IMDb.com
The Internet Movie Database (www.imdb.com) is the Web’s most comprehensive and authoritative source of information on movies, television, and celebrities. The site offers a searchable database of over 889,000 movies, TV, and entertainment programs and over 2.2 million cast and crew members. This year it launched Resume Services which allows actors, crew, and those who want to break into the business the ability to upload photos and craft a resume directly onto the IMDb. Starting at $2.50 per month, Resume Services is one of the lowest priced resume resources available.

The IMDb features include cast lists, quotes, trivia, reviews, box-office data, celebrity biographies, photographs, coverage of film festivals and major events, and streaming trailers. IMDb.com is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Amazon.com (www.amazon.com).

This announcement contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Actual results may differ significantly from management's expectations. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that include, among others, risks related to competition, management of growth, potential fluctuations in operating results, international expansion, outcomes of legal proceedings and claims, fulfillment center optimization, seasonality, commercial agreements, acquisitions and strategic transactions, foreign exchange rates, system interruption, significant amount of indebtedness, inventory, limited operating history, government regulation and taxation, payments, fraud, consumer trends, and new business areas. More information about factors that potentially could affect Amazon.com's financial results is included in Amazon.com's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005, and all subsequent filings.

 

Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #17 on: Dec 28, 2006, 08:30 AM »
From: http://www.metro.co.uk/fame/article.html?in_article_id=30796&in_page_id=7&in_a_source=

-----------------------------

Top 10 films of 2006
Thursday, December 28, 2006

As 2006 draws to a close, it will probably be remembered as the year Bond was back, as Daniel Craig put a Walther PPK to the head of all of his detractors in the most financially successful 007 film of all time.

Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest sailed into the record books as only the third film in history to glide past $1 billion at the international box office, while Ice Age 2: The Meltdown was the highest grossing animated film of the year.

Our film critic Damon Smith salutes his favourite films from the last 12 months...

1 - Brokeback Mountain: The most controversial film of the year, Ang Lee's heartbreaking love story, based on a 30-page novella by Annie Proulx, wears its heart on its sleeve to chart the tempestuous 20 year love story of ranch hands Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Ennis Del Mar (Heath Ledger), who cross paths one summer in ultra-macho 1960s Wyoming.

This is a heartrending portrait of an enduring yet impossible love, distinguished by gorgeous cinematography, haunting orchestral score and an elegant screenplay. Gyllenhaal's energetic turn as talkative dreamer Jack contrasts with Ledger's riveting portrayal of an introverted soul, simmering with self-loathing.

Michelle Williams and Anne Hathaway are stunning as the wives who end up casualties of Jack and Ennis's war with their true desires. As Jack puts it: "That ol' Brokeback got us good."

2 - United 93: On September 11, 2001, the world as we know it was changed forever. The events in New York City that fateful autumn still resonate today, and are a stark reminder of mankind's terrifying capability for destruction.

Paul Greengrass' harrowing recreation of events on United Airlines Flight 93, the fourth hijacked plane, unfolds in real time, beginning with scenes of the hijackers in their hotel rooms, preparing for their mission. Greengrass shoots events in the claustrophobic cabin and on the ground on handheld cameras, with a cast of largely unknown actors playing the passengers.

Key military and civilian personnel, including Ben Sliney (the man in charge of the FAA's command centre), play themselves, adding to the unsettling air of realism. Even though we know, with sickening certainty, how the film will end, we pray for a different resolution.

3 - The Death Of Mr Lazarescu: Cristi Puiu's jet black comedy, charting one man's haphazard journey through the Romanian health system, is by turns hilarious and emotionally heartbreaking, shot with an unflinching eye for detail.

Ion Fiscuteanu plays the eponymous Mr Lazarescu, who asks his neighbours to telephone for an ambulance. Paramedic Mioara (Luminita Gheorghiu) arrives and examines the patient, noticing the strong smell of alcohol, as well as an abnormal swelling in his stomach.

Fearing complications, Mioara asks Mr Lazarescu to accompany her to hospital in an ambulance driven by Leo (Gabriel Spahiu). As the vehicle races through the night, Mioara and her patient encounter hospital bureaucracy and indifference, as the tired medical staff struggle to meet the needs of the gravely ill and elderly, with only meagre resources at their disposal.

4 - Little Miss Sunshine: Husband and wife team Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris gearshift seamlessly from directing music videos to the vast canvas of big screen with their glorious celebration 21st century family life in all of its perplexing, dysfunctional glory.

Screenwriter Michael Arndt uses the familiar structure of a road movie to probe social mores and reveal the intense emotional bonds, which unite the Hoover family as they cram into a VW camper van and head across country to realise the dreams of seven-year-old wannabe beauty queen Olive Hoover (Abigail Breslin).

Intense moments of human drama punctuate the epic journey, which boasts some magical comic interludes, many sparked by Alan Arkin as the foul-mouthed grandfather, who has no time for social niceties or political correctness. Ten-year-old Breslin is sensational as the youngest member of the clan.

5 - Red Road: British writer-director Andrea Arnold, who collected the 2005 Oscar for Best Live Action Short, graduates effortlessly to feature film with this voyeuristic thriller that crawls under your skin and lingers in the memory long after the end credits roll.

CCTV operator Jackie (Kate Dickie) is one of the team of people charged with scouring the city, spotting trouble before it happens. Whilst focusing one of the cameras on the Red Road estate, Jackie is shocked to see Clyde (Tony Curran), the man she thought was still in prison for killing her husband and child.

Consumed with rage, Jackie begins to stalk Clyde and finds a way to get close to him, and punish him for his terrible crime. The tension is almost unbearable as Arnold's film builds to its shocking finale.

6 - Volver: The Spanish maestro, Pedro Almodovar, continues to dazzle with this stunning meditation on life and death, centring on sisters Raimunda (Penelope Cruz) and Sole (Lola Duenas), who have to contend with the death of their beloved Aunt Paula (Yohana Cobo) and the accidental killing of Raimunda's husband Paco (Antonio de la Torre).

Matters of life and death enter the realm of the surreal when the sisters become aware that they are being haunted by the ghost of their dead mother (Carmen Maura).

Almodovar's trademark shifts in tone from black comedy to heart-breaking drama are accomplished with customary flair, while Cruz relishes the opportunity - finally - to showcases her dramatic range, embodying a woman of sensuality and fierce determination. Her first Oscar nomination beckons.

7 - The Devil And Daniel Johnston: Described as an "outsider musician", singer/songwriter/artist Daniel Johnston won countless fans including David Bowie, Beck, The Flaming Lips and Kurt Cobain with his distinctive drawings and haunting songs of existential angst and suburban longing.

Johnston's fame is even more incredible when considered in the context of his personal journey: early in his career he suffered a nervous breakdown and he became obsessed with angels and demons.

With the love and support of his Christian fundamentalist parents Bill and Mabel, Daniel and his music found an audience, which continues to grow to this very day.

Documentary filmmaker Jeff Feuerzeig melds old Super-8 video diaries, archive performance footage, comic book-style drawings and specially recorded interviews to create a moving tribute to a creative genius whose battle with manic depression almost claimed his soul.

8 - Time To Leave (Le Temps Qui Reste): The second part of Francois Ozon's trilogy about mourning, which began with Under The Sand, is a heart-rending and elegiac story of a young man's painful acceptance of his mortality, distinguished by a superb lead performance from Melvil Poupaud.

During a photo shoot, fashion photographer Romain (Poupaud) collapses and is rushed to hospital. Bracing himself for the news that he has Aids, Romain is shocked to discover that the diagnosis is even worse: he has terminal cancer.

Refusing to share the prognosis with his family, Romain jettisons his boyfriend (Christian Sengewald), stuns his loved ones with a few painful home truths then heads for the beach to reconnect with his bohemian grandmother (Jeanne Moreau). Rage and denial gradually fade, supplanted by an acceptance of his impending death.

9 - Little Children: Shot with brutal, unerring honesty, Little Children is a work of unsettling surprises and extraordinary catharsis, documenting the emotional devastation wrought by an adulterous affair between two parents in a quiet corner of American suburbia.

Working from his own screenplay, co-written by Tom Perrotta, director Todd Field peeks behind the net curtains of two families in crisis, eliciting another powerhouse performance from Kate Winslet and Patrick Wilson as the married thirty-somethings who embark on a tempestuous liaison behind the backs of their emotionally cold other halves (Jennifer Connelly, Gregg Edelmann).

The fates of the adulterers become entwined with a paedophile (Jackie Earle Haley), who has been released back into the community, building to a final 10 minutes that squeezes the very breath out of you.

10 - Flags Of Our Fathers: Clint Eastwood goes from strength to strength with his stunning war opus exploring events leading up to the iconic raising of the flag on the Pacific island of Iwo Jima on February 23, 1945. That one black and white photograph, of five marines and one Navy Corpsman frozen in time, became a symbol of renewed hope for every family waiting for news of a loved one fighting against the Japanese.

Eastwood's picture, elegantly scripted by William Broyles Jr and Paul Haggis, employs a simple framing device to contrast the fortunes of the three surviving flag-bearing soldiers - "Doc" Bradley (Ryan Phillippe), Rene Gagnon (Jesse Bradford) and Ira Hayes (Adam Beach) - who are haunted by the ghosts of fallen comrades. Action sequences are brilliantly orchestrated, placing us into the midst of the fighting, silently praying for an end to slaughter.


Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #18 on: Dec 28, 2006, 08:39 AM »
For better or for worse...

Excerpt from http://thechronicleherald.ca/Entertainment/549718.html

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Recalling the year in fluff
Pop culture fact, fiction blurred boundaries
By JOCELYN NOVECK The Associated Press

No, Jon Stewart had to emphasize this year, Stewart and Colbert will not be a presidential ticket in 2008.

All in fun, of course, but there are some who get their news almost exclusively from Comedy Central’s fake newscasters. Was this the year where fact and fiction tended to blur together?

In publishing, one author claimed his memoirs were valid, even if they weren’t literally true. In film, we laughed at the antics of a randy, offensive, anti-Semitic journalist — we knew Borat was fake, but his co-stars didn’t (or did they?).

When two celebrities drew attention for truly offensive comments — anti-Semitic in one case, racist in the other — they told us it wasn’t the "real them," in essence. And, on YouTube, fans were crushed to learn that a lonely girl they’d come to love was just an actress playing a role.

Perhaps it’s impossible to enforce a theme upon a whole year of popular culture but it’s fun to look back. Join us for a chronological journey of things that made us talk in 2006.

   *****

March

Brokeback Mountain loses the best-picture Oscar to surprise winner  C****, but it’s no contest in the enduring-pop-culture-icon category. Those gay cowboys are the subject of endless jokes and imitations — the best being the fake movie trailers (remember Brokeback Penguin?) to the distinct guitar twangs of the movie soundtrack. And "brokeback" becomes an adjective unto itself, meaning something with gay overtones.

   *****


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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #19 on: Dec 29, 2006, 10:32 AM »
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2006/12/28/entertainment/e172259S02.DTL

Gyllenhaals flee fire in SF bay area!  Sounds like Jake was a hero.
"it's Love, Blockhead!"
-Pierre Marivaux  The Triumph of Love

"To love an idea is to love it a little more than one should."  -Jean Rostand

Offline tpe

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Re: News Coverage:December 2006
« Reply #20 on: Dec 29, 2006, 10:53 AM »
He seemed quite low-key, nonetheless.  I like that.  :)

Other articles about this were posted in the Jake Gyllenhaal News Articles/Interviews thread...